Posts Tagged ‘pigeons’

Tragic Plane Crash Blamed on Bird Strike

Wednesday, October 3rd, 2012

Bird strikes at airports are not uncommon and can end in tragedy. The Telegraph recently reported a plane crash in Napal that took the lives of 19 people when a vulture flew into one of the engines as the plane was taking off. Tragedies like these underscore the importance of effective bird control.

Civil Aviation Authority officials noted that the pilot was forced to make an emergency landing after the plane’s front engine had been hit by a bird and ceased to function. After trying to start a second engine, the damaged engine burst into flames. When the pilot attempted to land in the nearby Monahara River (to snuff out the flames), the plane crashed into a soccer fi eld on the riverbank and was engulfed in thick, black flames. The plane crashed just 500 meters from the airport. Luckily no one was on the ground in the plane’s path. It took firefighters over 40 minutes to extinguish the flames.

It was later determined that the bird was not sucked into the engine, but hit the right side propeller. A local engineer noted that 90 percent of bird strikes occur during ta keoff. Bird collisions can result in aircraft damage, especially if the bird is large and is ingested into a jet engine. In this case, a bird will damage a fan blade in the engine, which causes adjacent blades to displace and impact all the blades in the engine. Without effective bird control measures, airports are literally at the mercy of pest birds. 

Keeping Aircraft Hangars Bird Free With Bird Netting

Since most aircraft hangars are wide open during operating hours, birds can easily flock around door openings, overhangs, eaves, canopies, support beams and other lofty areas. Birds attracted to hangars include European starlings, house sparrows and pigeons. Once they begin to nest inside, their droppings and nesting materials can easily fall onto aircraft engines, maintenance  and testing areas, and parts storage bays. Parts contaminated with bird debris can fail during testing and even cause mishaps during flight. Workers can also slip and fall on bird droppings.

One popular bird deterrent currently used to keep birds out of aircraft hangars is Heavy Duty Bird Netting.  Correctly installed by Authorized Bird Control Installers, bird netting effectively prevents birds from accessing sensitive areas.  Heavy duty bird netting comes in a variety of mesh sizes. To block out pigeons or seagulls, consider using 1-1/8- to 2-inch mesh size netting. To seal out smaller birds like sparrows, a 3/4-inch mesh netting is recommended.

Bird control experts will tell you that it’s important to specify high quality netting. The best heavy duty netting is made of high-strength polyethylene. One manufacturer offers netting that has a burst strength of up to 40 pounds. It meets ISO 1806 and 9001 protocols, is UV stabilized, flame resistant and rot- and water-proof. The best netting will have a 250-degree Fahrenheit melting point and will also remain intact in “sub-zero” temperatures. This netting is black, comes with a 10-year guarantee and is virtually invisible when properly installed.

Installing heavy duty netting in aircraft hangars should be done properly by Authorized Bird Control Installers. Such installations typically require thousands of square feet of netting. For example, to properly install the netting horizontally across an entire hangar ceiling, special boom lifts and power gear are required. Improperly installed netting can droop and sag, allowing birds to enter through spaces.

Heavy Duty Pond Netting for Wetland Areas

Properly installed, Heavy Duty Pond Netting creates a physical barrier that prevents migratory birds from landing in ponds or other water areas around aviation facilities. The netting is made from a durable, UV-stabilized Dupont® knotted mesh nylon and designed for prolonged use in harsh environments. The netting comes in large stock sizes and custom cuts. Mesh sizes vary from 3/4” to 4” to exclude a variety of large and medium sized migrating birds.

Avian Control™ Bird Repellent

Ideal for repelling birds from large expansive areas like airports, Avian Control™ Bird Repellent is a non-toxic solution that discourages geese, gulls ducks starlings and other birds from gathering and grazing.  Avian Control’s unique patent pending formula irritates the mucous membranes of birds, yet it’s harmless to birds, pets and people (all ingredients are considered “Generally Regarded As Safe” by the FDA). It lasts up to three times longer than other goose deterrents. The repellent can be sprayed and is highly economical when fogged (fogging uses just 12 to 16 ounces per acre). Avian Control™ should be applied by a licensed pest control operator.

For additional advice on how to prevent bird strikes at your airport, consult an expert like the folks at Bird-B-Gone.

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Pigeons, poop and rats creating a stink by Bridge of Lions

Monday, July 30th, 2012

Article Shared From: St Augustine.com

From staff

The pigeons are causing a stink near the Bridge of Lions, and they’re bringing the rats with them.

The St. Augustine Police Department is asking people to help stop the problem by no longer feeding the birds.

According to the department, people have been putting bags of bird feed on the sidewalk near the Bridge of Lions. Those good intentions are causing a problem. (more…)

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Fundraising under way for pigeon control

Tuesday, July 17th, 2012

Article Shared From: The Star Herald

Written By: MAUNETTE LOEKS Staff Reporter

An initiative of the downtown revitalization project will include ridding the downtown of pests — pigeons.

For years, downtown business owners have complained about pigeons roosting in the downtown community. Efforts to rid downtown of the pigeons have not been successful, including demolition of the former Hergert Mill property made possible by Neighborhood Stabilization grant funding.

Instead, the pigeons have continued to call the downtown home. (more…)

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Pigeons cause structural damage on bridge

Tuesday, July 10th, 2012

Bridge pigeons’ days are numbered 

Article Shared From: The Otago Daily Times / NZ

Written By: Sarah Marquet

Pigeon poo is threatening the Alexandra bridge across the Clutha River, so the birds have to go.

New Zealand Transport Agency (NZTA) senior asset manager John Jarvis said the bridge’s structural steel was being corroded and, while it was not an immediate safety risk, action was needed to reduce the 400-strong flock of resident pigeons so damaged areas could be repaired.

The corrosion mostly affected the surface, but there were also some cases of pitting. (more…)

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These 100-Year-Old Aerial Photos Were Taken by Pigeons

Monday, June 4th, 2012

Article Shared From: Treehugger.com

From Wikipedia Commons

Stephen Messenger
Technology / Gadgets
May 31, 2012

Although pigeons nowadays are largely regarded as grubby urban pests, bumblers for bread crumbs, and unwelcome statuary redecorators — in the not-too-distant past, their service to mankind was much loftier indeed. Not only were these hardy birds used to swiftly carry important messages and materials across great distances, for a brief stint at the turn of the last century, an elite group of camera-wielding pigeons also became early pioneers of a then burgeoning field: aerial photography.

In 1903, a German pharmacist named Julius Neubronner started employing carrier pigeons to receive and fulfill emergency prescriptions from a hospital in the region. One day, after a bird of his mysteriously returned after being lost a month late, Julius began to devise a way to track their flights. (more…)

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Pigeons’ brains have ‘GPS neurons’ to help them navigate, scientists found

Monday, April 30th, 2012

Article Shared From: The Global Post 

Written By:

Pigeons‘ brains appear to contain “GPS neurons” that help them navigate, according to a new study published in Science journal.

Scientists at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas have discovered a group of 53 cells in the birds’ brains that respond to the direction and strength of the Earth’s magnetic field, BBC News reported.

Le-Qing Wu and David Dickman, the study’s lead researchers, found that the neurons “buzz” at different levels depending on how strong the magnetic field is and which direction it’s pointing in, Discover Magazine’s blog reported(more…)

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New study overturns prevailing theory of how birds navigate

Wednesday, April 18th, 2012

Article Shared From: Bird Watching Daily

Posted Wed, Apr 11 2012 11:47 AM by Matt Mendenhall

Scientists have thrown cold water on the theory that iron-rich nerve cells in birds’ bills help them navigate using Earth’s magnetic field.

Researchers from Austria, France, Australia, and England, writing in a new study published today in Nature, report that iron-rich cells in the bills of pigeons are in fact specialized white blood cells called macrophages. Macrophages play a vital role in defending against infection and recycling iron from red blood cells, but they’re unlikely to be involved in magnetic sensing, the scientists say. That’s because they are not excitable cells and cannot produce electrical signals that could be registered by neurons and therefore influence a bird’s behavior.
(more…)

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Water source draws pigeons to Casa Grande community causing illness, property damage

Monday, April 2nd, 2012

Article Shared From: TriValleyCentral.com

Courtesy of a Mission Royale resident, Pigeons leave quite a mess on the roofs of some Mission Royale homes last month in Casa Grande.

Written By: Melissa St. Aude

 

When Lyle Roorda bought his home in the Mission Royale community in 2006, he did not anticipate sharing his house with dozens of pigeons.But despite Roorda’s best efforts to eradicate them, the pigeons continue to nest on his roof. At last count, he had at least 30 or 40 pigeons living on top of his house and the mess they create — feathers and droppings as well as the maggots and other insects that live and breed in the bird debris — has become intolerable and a health hazard, he said.

“It’s a major problem,” Roorda said. “And it’s getting worse. The mess they leave behind is sickening.”
(more…)

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Birds on Buildings

Tuesday, July 26th, 2011

Written By: Dr. Rob Fergus

Many people are surprised to find birds causing problems on buildings in urban areas, but birds are actually very common in cities and many species may potentially create problems on buildings.  Fortunately, by understanding the birds that most often cause problems, as well as the architectural features that attract them to buildings, nuisance bird problems can usually be addressed by making the building less attractive to the birds.

Problem birds

While any bird can potentially cause a problem on buildings, most problems in American cities are caused by three bird species introduced from Europe—pigeons, starlings, and house sparrows.  These birds adapted to living in European settlements and cities for thousands of years, and found an easy life living in and around our buildings when first brought to America in past centuries.  Early colonists first brought pigeons to America as a food source, while 19th Century enthusiasts brought over starlings and house sparrows in a misguided effort to control caterpillars (house sparrows) or introduce to America all the birds mentioned in the works of Shakespeare (starlings).  All three of these species readily eat discarded human food and nest on buildings—making them the perfect urban invaders.  In addition to these non-native birds, a few native birds may cause problems, especially when large numbers congregate on rooftops (crows, gulls, and occasionally vultures) or nest on exterior walls (swallows).  In fact, birds that are urban invaders do so well that there are usually more individual birds per square mile in cities than in the countryside!

(more…)

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Piergowers protest pigeon poisoning

Thursday, December 9th, 2010

From WWSB ABC 7 Florida:

“They were flopping around falling into the water.”

SARASOTA COUNTY – Fishermen at the Venice Fishing Pier say dozens of pigeons began dying Monday morning. Turns out a pest control company for Sharky’s restaurant used a poison to rid the waterfront business from what they call a health hazard.

Noel Hackelberg says while fishing on the pier Monday, birds literally began to fall from the sky. “They were flopping around falling into the water. The guy was coming around trying to pick them up as fast as he could.”

Estimates from fisherman like Barry Garman say it was about 50 pigeons. He says it was a terrible sight. “It’s disgusting. There was a mom with a small child and she had to leave because the child was so upset to see what was going on. There was no warning to anybody that this was going to happen.”

On a windy Wednesday, birds swirled around the pier and restaurant. Manager Justin Pachota says they have a growing pigeon problem. “It is sort of a health risk. You have feathers and pigeon feces that are coming into play. We have had complaints from patrons.”

That’s why they say they hired someone to poison their plethora of pigeons after months of trying other non-lethal methods. “We tried sonic transmissions to keep the birds away, statues…transmitting eagle sounds.”

“This is quite upsetting.” Kevin Barton with the Wildlife Center of Venice says they’ve helped save some of the birds over the years and are concerned about what has happened; concerned for other protected birds there, too. “I care for all the animals, but when you are talking about the potential. We got reports that a Bald Eagle had caught two. It would not surprise me.

Read the original article here

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From Bird-B-Gone:

There are many humane alternatives to lethal bird control and a few reasons why physical bird deterrents may be more effective. Poisoning birds is not only inhumane and a potential PR disaster, it’s really only putting a band-aid on an existing problem.  Removing birds does not address the factors that are attracting the birds to the affected area in the first place. Once you remove birds from a property, you are simply leaving vacancy for new ones to move in. Addressing the reason why the birds are attracted to the area, by using physical bird deterrents such as Bird Spikes or Bird Netting will yield lasting results.

If you have a pest bird problem, Bird-B-Gone can help in a few ways. If you want a professional to come out and take care of the situation, Bird-B-Gone works with a network of authorized installers across the U.S. who can help solve bird problems for homes and commercial and industrial buildings. If you are a pest control operator or installer, Bird-B-Gone offers a complete line of professional grade bird deterrents to accommodate your customer’s needs. Give us a call at 1-800-392-6915, email us at nobirds@birdbgone.com, or visit http://www.birdbgone.com.

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Pigeons gamble like people

Wednesday, October 13th, 2010

From MSNBC:

New study finds birds feed in a way similar to gambling behavior

By Stephanie Pappas

If you had a choice, would you press a button that gave you an evenly spaced $3 per push, or would you choose the button with the big, but rare, payoff of $10 — even if that meant you got only $2 per push on average?

The answer may seem obvious, but anyone who gambles gives up a sure bet of money in their pocket in hopes of a big, unlikely win. Now, a new study finds that pigeons make similar bad choices.

The research, published Oct. 13 in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B, found that pigeons given the choice to peck a light that would give them three food pellets each time almost universally preferred a light that would give them a payout of 10 pellets 20 percent of the time. Averaged out, that meant pigeons were choosing to get two pellets per peck instead of three.

The reason could be that pigeons are motivated by a surprising change from their expectations, according to study author Thomas Zentall, a psychologist at the University of Kentucky. The same phenomenon could explain why human gamblers ignore their losses and focus on their rarer, but more surprising, wins.

Read the complete article here

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Bird Proofing Commercial Buildings

Thursday, September 17th, 2009

Birds-PoopUnlike homes and boats, commercial buildings suffer damage from pest birds on a grand scale. Commercial  building owners spend millions of dollars every year to deal with problems associated with pest birds. The only viable solution is bird proofing.

Failure to bird proof a commercial building can lead to all sorts of problems. The droppings pest birds leave seriously detract from a building’s appearance. The acid secretion produced by the fungi that live in bird droppings can mar paint and other surfaces. Cleaning and restoring buildings damaged by pest birds can be very expensive. Nests and droppings can, over time, clog gutters and down pipes, causing rooftops to leak or fill with water and possibly collapse. Pest bird nests and droppings can get sucked into ducts, grilles and vents, clogging commercial air conditioning and heating units, permanently damaging these expensive systems.

Bird droppings deposited at commercial building entrances and fire escapes increase the likelihood that pedestrians may slip and fall on them, creating a huge legal liability to commercial property owners. Droppings also spoil finished products in loading bays and storage areas. They ruin the appearance of costly finished goods, metal panels, and stonework. Droppings can also eat into and destroy wood, paper and cardboard packaging of products on pallets or outside storage.

(more…)

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