Posts Tagged ‘pigeon control’

Bird-B-Gone University for Bird Control Scores High in Recent Audit

Thursday, January 16th, 2014

Bird Control Training

Bird-B-Gone Inc.’s Bird-B-Gone University was recently audited for review and approval by the California Department of Pesticide Regulation (DPR). Bird-B-Gone received excellent remarks from the DPR as a four hour Continuing Education (CE) credit in Bird Control training.

Bird-B-Gone University, a bird control training course offered by Bird-B-Gone, was recently audited by the Department of Pesticide Regulation. The course covers many things commercial bird control installers need to know. The course qualifies as a continuing education course through the DPR.  Bird-B-Gone provides this free training at their facilities in Santa Ana, CA at least every other month.

Mike Dougherty, a bird control engineer at Bird-B-Gone, was well received as the presenter of this course.  “Mr. Dougherty was very knowledgeable in the subject matter and provided useful pesticide and pest management information,” says Lisa Estridge, Environmental Scientist with the DPR. “He presented bird management from an IPM perspective and encouraged attendees to use a variety of bird control methods, such as exclusion, sanitation and mechanical tools. His presentation included a PowerPoint presentation, photographs, sample products and anecdotes that made the course more relatable to the attendees.”

Bird-B-Gone University is designed to ensure pest control operators are equipped with the necessary knowledge and tools to properly install Bird-B-Gone bird control products. “All questions from the attendees were answered quickly and accurately. In addition, the course materials and comfortable facility, along with the announcement at the beginning of the course to silence cell phones, created an environment conducive to learning. Overall, the course was informative and well received by the attendees,” says Estridge.

To learn more about becoming an Authorized Installer of Bird-B-Gone’s bird control products click here.

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Plastic Bird Spikes to Deter Birds from Ledges

Tuesday, November 26th, 2013

deter birds Deter Birds from Ledges

Larger birds, like pigeons, seagulls and crows land in areas where they are not wanted, creating a mess and an unsanitary environment. Ledges make the perfect landing spot for birds to roost and look for food and predators. They leave behind a nasty mess of bird droppings, however.  Deter birds from landing on ledges with polycarbonate bird spikes. Plastic bird spikes work well to keep birds away by creating an uneven surface, making it impossible for birds to land on the treated area. The spikes are humane and will not harm the birds.

Polycarbonate bird spikes work on flat or curved signs. Choose from seven colors: clear, white, tan, grey, brown, black and brick red. Plastic spikes are available in different spike widths: 3”, 5” and 7” to cover different ledge and surface widths. Since the spikes come pre-assembled in two foot strips with pre-drilled holes along the base, installation is fast and easy – cutting time to install in half. Plastic spikes can be glued or screwed to most surfaces.

Bird-B-Gone polycarbonate spikes are manufactured in the USA and carry a five year guarantee.

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Electric Flat Track Bird Repellent

Wednesday, November 6th, 2013

bird repellentBird Repellent: Electric Flat Track System

Birds often land and roost in areas where they are not wanted. If you or your customer has a bird problem in an area where visual appearance is important, a bird repellent that is less conspicuous might be a good solution. Bird Jolt Flat Track is a physical bird deterrent that is virtually invisible, making it perfect in areas where visual appearance matters.

Bird Jolt Flat Track conditions birds to stay away from unwanted areas by giving off a mild electrical shock when they attempt to land on the treated area. The shock will not harm birds; it alters their behavioral patterns to associate the unpleasant feeling with the treated area, causing birds to stay away. The system will deter any size bird and works on buildings, signs, eaves and most high-profile areas birds land and roost. This electric track bird deterrent system has multi-patented anti-arcing and glue through designs.

Bird Jolt Flat Track is and now available in six different colors, –clear, grey, stone, black, terracotta and target red– to match most building materials.

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Keep Birds Away with Bird-Off Gel

Friday, October 4th, 2013

keep birds awayBirds landing in unwanted areas create a problem for commercial building owners and property managers. To keep birds from landing on ledges, windowsills, signs and other areas where birds are not wanted, apply Bird-Off Gel to target locations.

Bird-Off Gel is the first bio repellent gel. It is used to prevent pigeons and other large birds from roosting and congregating in unwanted areas. Unlike other bird repellent gels which are made from polybutene, Bird-Off Gel is an oil base bird repellent gel. The ingredients are nontoxic and will not harm the bird. When birds come in contact with Bird-Off Gel, they are still able walk and fly; they will not be trapped on the treated surface. The gel simply creates an unpleasant sticky feeling causing birds to move to a more comfortable roosting location.

Application is very easy! Simply use a caulking gun to apply the gel on the appropriate treatment area. The gel is available in tubes or in five gallon pails to fit any size job.

Get rid of birds with Bird-Off Gel!

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Plastic Bird Spikes to Deter Birds from Signs

Tuesday, August 13th, 2013

get rid of birds with plastic bird spikesSigns are important to businesses and communities. We look at them every day so it’s important that signs represent the business or town in a clean and professional manner. Larger birds, like pigeons, seagulls and crows land in areas where they are not wanted, creating a mess and an unsanitary environment. Signs are no exception; birds will sit and poop on sings, ruining the visual appeal. Keep birds off signs with polycarbonate bird spikes. This will help you avoid unnecessary costs and potential health and legal issues. Plastic bird spikes work well to keep birds away by creating an uneven surface, making it impossible for birds to land in the treated area. The spikes will not harm the birds.

Polycarbonate bird spikes work on flat or curved signs. Choose from seven colors: clear, white, tan, grey, brown, black and brick red. Plastic spikes are available in different spike widths: 3”, 5” and 7” to cover different ledge and surface widths. Since the spikes come pre-assembled in two foot strips with pre-drilled holes along the base, installation is fast and easy – cutting time to install in half. Plastic spikes can be glued or screwed to most surfaces.

Bird-B-Gone polycarbonate spikes are manufactured in the USA and carry a five year guarantee.

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Get Rid of Large Birds with Polycarbonate Bird Spikes

Thursday, July 11th, 2013

get rid of birds plastic spikeLarger birds, like pigeons, seagulls and crows land in areas where they are not wanted, creating a mess and an unsanitary environment. Taking care of bird issues when they arise is pertinent to ensuring you avoid unnecessary costs and potential health and legal issues. Birds sitting and roosting on a ledge or other flat surface will require a physical bird deterrent to get rid of pest birds. Polycarbonate bird spikes work well to keep birds away by creating an uneven surface, making it impossible for birds to land in the treated area.

Polycarbonate bird spikes work on areas like beams, ledges, under eaves, rooftops and other flat or curved surfaces. Choose from seven colors: clear, white, tan, grey, brown, black and brick red. Plastic spikes are available in different spike widths: 3”, 5” and 7” to cover different ledge and surface widths. Since the spikes come pre-assembled in two foot strips with pre-drilled holes along the base, installation is fast and easy – cutting time to install in half. Plastic spikes can be glued or screwed to most surfaces.

Bird-B-Gone polycarbonate spikes are manufactured in the USA and carry a five year guarantee.

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Keep Birds Away: Bird Control for Property Managers

Wednesday, June 26th, 2013

get rid of birdsUnhappy tenants create unhappy property managers. As a property manager it is your responsibility to upkeep the property so the tenants are happy and for the longevity of the property. When birds are sitting, pooping and nesting on roofs, canopies, window seals, balconies, in trees and other areas, it creates a mess that visually unappealing and damaging in some cases. It also poses health risks for your tenants and employees and legal risks for property owners.

Bird Control is necessary for property managers. Depending on the type bird you are dealing with and where they are located on the property, there are several solution possibilities to keep birds away. Bird Jolt Flat Track™, Bird Spikes and Bird Slope™ are a few options for property managers when it comes to getting rid of birds and maintaining your property.

Bird Jolt Flat Track is a low profile electrical track system that gives off a slight shock when birds land on the surface of the strip. The shock will not harm the birds; it will condition them to stay away from the treated area. Flat Track is now available in several colors: clear, black, gray, stone, Terra Cotta and red.

Bird spikes are a physical bird deterrent used to prevent larger birds, like seagulls and pigeons, from landing and nesting. The spikes will not harm the birds or humans. The spikes simply create an uneven surface making it impossible for the birds to land in a particular area. Bird Spikes come in a stainless steel or plastic. Depending on the width of the ledge, roofline or problem area, you can choose 3”, 5” or 8” stainless steel spikes and 3”, 5” or 7” plastic spikes.

Bird Slope keeps birds of all types and sizes from perching and roosting on ledges, beams, eaves and other 90° angle areas. Slope extenders are available for ledges up to 10” wide and end caps ensure birds don’t find their way behind the slope.

Keep your tenants safe and happy and your property clean! Use bird control products to keep pest birds away from your property!

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Bird Control: Trapping Birds with A Net Launcher

Tuesday, June 18th, 2013

get rid of birdsBirds that gather in large flocks are more difficult to manage than a few pest birds landing and nesting on your property. There are many methods to deter birds but when you have a large group the situation can become overwhelming. At this point you should consider flock reduction. The best way to reduce a flock is by utilizing professional trap and release methods. While bird spike, electrical track systems or netting, will deter birds and keep them from nesting and roosting in treated areas, but then you will most likely be dealing with a large group of displaced homing birds.

The Super Talon Ultra Net Launcher is a humane method of trapping the birds in order to release them in a more appropriate environment. The net launcher uses compressed air cartridges to launch a weighted net up to 60 feet. The two inch mesh used with the net launcher can be used to trap any size bird. It comes complete with a carrying case and all necessary components and it can be re-used over and over.

Consider using trapping methods to get rid of birds on your property. There are professional services that will perform the actual trap and release of birds for you. Give us a call and we will help you choose the right trapping device and connect you with a professional trapper in your area.

Keep birds away from your property!

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Need to Keep Birds Out of Rafters? Bird Netting to the Rescue

Thursday, June 6th, 2013

keep birds off with bird nettingBirds love to sit and nest in high places that protect them from predators and weather. This means that places with open ceilings with beams and rafters, like warehouses or manufacturing facilities, are perfect for birds in search of a nesting area.

Birds will sit on beams, pooping and preening, which causes a huge mess but the acidic droppings can erode building materials. Bird droppings also carry up to 60 transmittable diseases and when dried can blow around in dust form and be inhaled by humans. Nesting also creates a mess and a hazard. Workers who have to climb in the rafters, to change lights for example, are at risk of being injured or picking up diseases. Additionally, droppings fall on equipment and product or anything produced in the open area facility, potentially damaging or ruining the expensive equipment and product.

This is a serious problem that must be addressed. The best way to keep birds out is to create a barrier that fully excludes birds from being able to enter the area altogether. Bird Netting is the perfect solution for getting rid of birds in your rafters. The best, most efficient and effective bird netting is the Bird Net 2000™, which provides 100% bird exclusion and is the #1 bird net specified by architects and government agencies. Depending on the size of your affected area, there are multiple options for bird netting

Bird netting requires professional installation and installation hardware. If you do not have an installer, we can connect you with authorized installers in your area to ensure your bird netting is properly installed and your bird problems are solved.

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Keep Birds Off Ledges with Bird Spikes

Tuesday, May 14th, 2013

keep birds away with bird spikesLarge birds, such as pigeons and gulls, are notorious for landing on the ledges of buildings causing hazardous situations as well as structural damage and a very unpleasant visual appearance. Bird control is necessary to keep large birds away.

There are huge risks associated with pest birds on buildings and ledges. Bird droppings are acidic and can cause structural damage by eating through paint, some roofing materials and fabrics resulting in massive spending on restoration and/or complete replacement. Health hazards associated with pest birds pooping on and around buildings are serious since birds carry a multitude of diseases that are easily spread when droppings dry and form a dust that is sucked through AC units and then inhaled. And of course legal issues arise when slip and fall incidents occur on your premises due to messy bird droppings. 

How do you get rid of birds on your buildings and ledges? Bird Spikes! Bird•B•Gone has top class bird spikes that will keep birds away. Bird spikes come in polycarbonate (plastic) or stainless steel and are the ultimate solution to getting rid of birds on buildings and ledges. The bird spikes are durable, effective and long lasting with a five year guaranty on the polycarbonate bird spikes and a 10 year guarantee on the stainless steel bird spikes. Bird•B•Gone’s patented technology on its stainless steel bird spikes make them superior to any spike on the market. Bird spikes are available in a variety of sizes (and colors in the plastic bird spikes) to suit your bird control needs.

Installing bird spikes will save your company time and money by ensuring birds stay off of your buildings and ledges. Installation is easy as bird spikes can either be glued down with polyurethane adhesive or nailed down. Bird•B•Gone also offers a free training class to guide installers through the process and if you don’t have your own installation crew, Bird•B•Gone can connect you with professional installers in your area.

Our online bird spike comparison chart or our team of specialists will help you determine which bird spikes are best for your bird problem. Keep pest birds away from your ledges!
We proudly make all of our bird spikes in the USA.

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Oil company fined $22,500 over dead birds

Thursday, December 20th, 2012

BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) – A Denver-based oil company has pleaded guilty to violating federal law in the deaths of migratory birds in fluid pits at the company’s oil and gas drilling facilities in Montana, Wyoming and Nebraska and has been fined $22,500.

The U.S. Attorney’s Office in Montana said SM Energy Co. pleaded guilty Wednesday one misdemeanor count of violating the Migratory Bird Treaty Act in each state. U.S. Magistrate Carolyn Ostby also placed the company on probation for a year and ordered it to make a $7,500 payment to the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation.

The case dates back to 2005, when the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service documented deaths of a dozen migratory birds at uncovered open fluid pits at Nance Petroleum sites in Wyoming. Nance later become an SM Energy subsidiary.

Copyright 2012 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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Bird Flu Controlled in Mexico

Wednesday, December 19th, 2012

by Xinhua News Agency

Image credit: US EPA

Mexican President Felipe Calderon on Wednesday announced that the bird flu having broken out four months ago in the western Jalisco state has been “totally controlled.”

“After 68 days with no new cases reported, we are entering the stage of eradication” of the H7N3 virus, Calderon said at the presidential residence.

Mexico will recover very soon from the highly dangerous avian influenza, he said, stressing that the control of this disease is the result of “great effort of the government and producers.”

Among the measures, he said the culling of over 22 million chickens, the establishment of a sanitary cordon and the development of an “effective vaccine against the disease, are crucial to control the virus quickly and decisively.”

In the past months, “around 140 million doses of vaccine have been applied, and we also have a sufficient reserve bank to use if necessary,” the president said.

Thanks to efforts to restore the productive capacity of the farming, Mexico is expected to recover in November the number of laying hens to the level prior to the outbreak of the avian influenza, he said.

Calderon noted that the goal now is to stimulate the creation of new chicken producers’ centers in other parts of Mexico to diversify regional egg production and prevent such an impact in the future. However, Jaime Crivelli, president of the National Poultry Union, criticized the government for minimizing the impact of the bird flu on egg production.

As a response, Calderon said his government acted in time, because otherwise the damage to egg production would have been irreversible in his country, the fifth largest producer in the world and the largest per capita egg consumer.

He announced a support of $16.6 million (215 million pesos)in normalizing egg production and credits for those who want to engage in egg production.

The president noted that so far 65 percent of egg production has been restored. Besides, the country has imported nearly 14,000 tons of eggs, mainly from the United States, to meet demand.

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Battle to Protect Norwich’s Historic Buildings From Pigeons Widens

Tuesday, December 18th, 2012

by Richard Wheeler (via Norwich Evening News 24)

The battle to protect Norwich’s historic buildings from feathered invaders has intensified – as officials attempt to defend two more city attractions from their droppings.

How it could look if pigeons attacked Norwich Castle. (Image credit: Norwich Evening News 24)

Proposals to install pigeon-guarding systems have been put forward for the Bridewell and Shirehall, following a successful application for a similar idea at Norwich Castle. Mess on the pavement outside the Shirehall, in Market Avenue, below where the pigeons roost, affects access to the building for visitors according to planning documents from the Norfolk museums service.

The papers add that the droppings are also causing white staining to the stonework, which cleaning is “unlikely to remove”, as well as health and safety issues. At the Bridewell, the documents state the volume of pigeon waste creates a risk of “slipping on wet foul”.

Measures to deter pigeons from sills and ledges in the museum’s central courtyard were installed during a recent £1.5m refurbishment. But the plans reveal these are ineffective in many areas.

There are concerns at both sites that the mess stops workers being able to reach and clean out gutters and pipes to stop them getting blocked. There is a risk water could seep into the walls and damage the buildings’ walls if these are not unblocked.

Posts with thin wire on them are proposed for both buildings. These aim to stop pigeons from being able to roost or perch.

Museum officials are also bidding for cash to fund a similar defence system at Norwich Castle after the city council approved the plan. It is hoped these measures will protect the 11th century structure from further damage. The post and wire system was trialled and also checked by English Heritage before permission was granted, to try and ensure it will not ruin the appearance of the castle.

Stuart Garner, operations manager for Norwich museums, said: “We’ve had the pilot and we all agreed on the best way forward with English Heritage. We’ve got the majority of listed-building consent. Now, it’s preparing the documents for the funding.”

Mr Garner said it was Norfolk County Council’s responsibility to look after the attractions, but the city council has agreed to contribute 30pc toward the costs of pigeon-proofing them. No cost figures have yet to be made public.

Dr Will Fletcher, English Heritage’s inspector of ancient monuments in Norfolk, said it is difficult trying to protect historic buildings from pigeons.

But he said it involved pinpointing the ideal roosting locations and then installing new equipment without damaging the fabric of the building while ensuring it is “sympathetic” to its appearance.

Dr Fletcher said of the Norwich Castle plans: “It can all be taken away without damaging the fabric and leaving the castle intact.

“We will come back six to eight months or a year later down the line to see how effective it’s been.

“We are aware of the fact pigeons can be a problem elsewhere. We’ve talked about the issues, falconry and other options around the town but it pushes it from one place to another.

“There will be an ongoing issue and it’s really something for the people of Norwich to get involved in and we welcome their views.”

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Pest Controllers Withdraw Bids for Hannibal Pigeon Project

Wednesday, December 12th, 2012

by Maggie Menderski (via Quincy Herald-Whig)

HANNIBAL MO. — The Hannibal City Council thought it had addressed a problem with pigeons.

Now it is being forced to address pigeon activism.

A large flock of pigeons roost atop the steeple of the Fifth Street Baptist Church in Hannibal, Mo. The City of Hannibal is looking for solutions to control the pigeons. (Image credit: H-W Photo/Phil Carlson)
Councilmen unanimously voted Oct. 16 to accept a bid from Reliable Pest Solutions to handle the local pigeon population with poisoned feed. Garry Allen, general manager of Reliable, estimated 500 pigeons live in Hannibal, and this surplus of birds causes a danger to the community’s property and health.

Since that vote, People for Ethnical Treatment of Animals (PETA) has sent a letter asking for the city to cancel the plan, and news sources nationwide have picked up on the story. The negative press has caused Reliable and another local company, Big River Pest Control, to withdraw their estimates from the project.

“If Hannibal officials have decided that poisoning is the best way to control the pigeon population, they simply haven’t done their homework,” PETA Senior Vice President of Cruelty Investigations Daphna Nachminovitch said in a press release. “It’s unconscionable that the city would subject birds to agony and its own citizens to the spectacle of having to watch birds convulse in the streets when humane, proven and cost-effective measures are readily available.”

PETA Senior Cruelty Caseworker Kristin Simon said the organization had received several emails expressing concerns for the pigeons and the community. Her letter to Hannibal Mayor Roy Hark states that the poison, Avitol, would impair the birds’ the nervous systems. After consumption, the pigeons suffer from disorientation, which leads to erratic flight and eventual death.

“Everyone has a big concern and a right to a big concern with such dangerous (chemical),” Simon said.

Since the media explosion, Allen has fielded dozens of phone calls regarding the poisoning method. Councilman Mike Dobson, who supported the method during the Oct. 16 city council meeting, has answered several calls as well, but the complaints he’s heard have come from outside Hannibal.

“I haven’t had one phone call with a local person against it,” he said.

The $3,560 bid from Reliable Pest Solutions would have required the city to gain access to local businesses and place poisoned feed on the top of buildings for the pigeons to eat. The poison would then have killed a small amount of the birds and startled the rest out of the city.

Allen said this method had been successful with local business owners in the past several years.

“The problem with it is that we didn’t keep it up,” Allen said. “You just can’t do it once and walk away.”

Pigeons, starlings and sparrows are the only three birds classified as pests. Because of birds’ habits and flocking tendencies, exterminators may diminish the population just as they would handle a surplus cockroaches or ants. Allen said pest control companies use poisons in some situations, but the products are not used carelessly.

“It doesn’t make sense for a responsible company to do something irresponsible,” he said. “You don’t make money.”

Dobson supported the poison method because he has seen it work firsthand for a company in Quincy. While Avitrol may shock the pigeon population out of Hannibal, Simon feared the poison could harm domestic animals as well as other birds and wildlife. Allen said only 10 percent of the feed would be poisoned. Dobson reasoned a 100-pound dog would have to eat a minimum of 15 pigeons before the poison in the feed would cause the dog to be sick.

“If I was in the business of killing people’s pets, then you don’t have a business,” Allen said.

The city now must pursue another solution. The U.S. Department of Agriculture had submitted a $6,700 bid for a pellet gun program, which would also involve pigeon mortality.

Dobson also has been in contact with a horse whisperer for pigeons. Horse whisperers adopt training and handling techniques for horses that are kinder and gentler than traditional methods. This person has offered to come speak with the birds at no cost to the city.

Simon recommended installing anti-roosting products such as bird spikes, slides and coils. She also suggested implementing statues of natural predators, creating a wildlife feeding prohibition, keeping garbage tightly contained and avoiding artificial sources of standing water.

Allen also had presented the city with a birth control plan for the pigeons. The process involves providing sterilizing feed to the population and then letting them die off naturally without being able to reproduce. This process requires more money to pay for continuous feeding. It also happens gradually, rather than in a couple weeks’ time.

During the Oct. 16 meeting, Dobson stressed nuisance and dangers pigeons cause to a city. Pigeon feces, which is acidic, wears away at roofs and damages cars, and it also can cause health-related issues.

Marion County Health Department Administrator Jean McBride declined to comment about potential health hazards pigeons might have on the community.

According to the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene website, pigeon droppings pose a small health risk. Humans may contract histoplasmosis, cryptococcosis and psittacosis by inhaling particles from pigeon droppings. Cleaning pigeon droppings does not pose a serious health risk to most people, but avoiding direct contact with the droppings is recommended. People cleaning feces off a car or a windowsill should wear disposable gloves and washable clothing.

Allen said the pigeons have taken to Hannibal for its architecture and river access, explaining that they look for structures to sit on and ways to obtain food.

“It’s all about habitat, and they found a place they like,” he said.

Hark anticipates a solution would be discussed at the Nov. 6 council meeting.

“We’re still looking at what we can do, but we haven’t made a decision,” Hark said.

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Tragic Plane Crash Blamed on Bird Strike

Wednesday, October 3rd, 2012

Bird strikes at airports are not uncommon and can end in tragedy. The Telegraph recently reported a plane crash in Napal that took the lives of 19 people when a vulture flew into one of the engines as the plane was taking off. Tragedies like these underscore the importance of effective bird control.

Civil Aviation Authority officials noted that the pilot was forced to make an emergency landing after the plane’s front engine had been hit by a bird and ceased to function. After trying to start a second engine, the damaged engine burst into flames. When the pilot attempted to land in the nearby Monahara River (to snuff out the flames), the plane crashed into a soccer fi eld on the riverbank and was engulfed in thick, black flames. The plane crashed just 500 meters from the airport. Luckily no one was on the ground in the plane’s path. It took firefighters over 40 minutes to extinguish the flames.

It was later determined that the bird was not sucked into the engine, but hit the right side propeller. A local engineer noted that 90 percent of bird strikes occur during ta keoff. Bird collisions can result in aircraft damage, especially if the bird is large and is ingested into a jet engine. In this case, a bird will damage a fan blade in the engine, which causes adjacent blades to displace and impact all the blades in the engine. Without effective bird control measures, airports are literally at the mercy of pest birds. 

Keeping Aircraft Hangars Bird Free With Bird Netting

Since most aircraft hangars are wide open during operating hours, birds can easily flock around door openings, overhangs, eaves, canopies, support beams and other lofty areas. Birds attracted to hangars include European starlings, house sparrows and pigeons. Once they begin to nest inside, their droppings and nesting materials can easily fall onto aircraft engines, maintenance  and testing areas, and parts storage bays. Parts contaminated with bird debris can fail during testing and even cause mishaps during flight. Workers can also slip and fall on bird droppings.

One popular bird deterrent currently used to keep birds out of aircraft hangars is Heavy Duty Bird Netting.  Correctly installed by Authorized Bird Control Installers, bird netting effectively prevents birds from accessing sensitive areas.  Heavy duty bird netting comes in a variety of mesh sizes. To block out pigeons or seagulls, consider using 1-1/8- to 2-inch mesh size netting. To seal out smaller birds like sparrows, a 3/4-inch mesh netting is recommended.

Bird control experts will tell you that it’s important to specify high quality netting. The best heavy duty netting is made of high-strength polyethylene. One manufacturer offers netting that has a burst strength of up to 40 pounds. It meets ISO 1806 and 9001 protocols, is UV stabilized, flame resistant and rot- and water-proof. The best netting will have a 250-degree Fahrenheit melting point and will also remain intact in “sub-zero” temperatures. This netting is black, comes with a 10-year guarantee and is virtually invisible when properly installed.

Installing heavy duty netting in aircraft hangars should be done properly by Authorized Bird Control Installers. Such installations typically require thousands of square feet of netting. For example, to properly install the netting horizontally across an entire hangar ceiling, special boom lifts and power gear are required. Improperly installed netting can droop and sag, allowing birds to enter through spaces.

Heavy Duty Pond Netting for Wetland Areas

Properly installed, Heavy Duty Pond Netting creates a physical barrier that prevents migratory birds from landing in ponds or other water areas around aviation facilities. The netting is made from a durable, UV-stabilized Dupont® knotted mesh nylon and designed for prolonged use in harsh environments. The netting comes in large stock sizes and custom cuts. Mesh sizes vary from 3/4” to 4” to exclude a variety of large and medium sized migrating birds.

Avian Control™ Bird Repellent

Ideal for repelling birds from large expansive areas like airports, Avian Control™ Bird Repellent is a non-toxic solution that discourages geese, gulls ducks starlings and other birds from gathering and grazing.  Avian Control’s unique patent pending formula irritates the mucous membranes of birds, yet it’s harmless to birds, pets and people (all ingredients are considered “Generally Regarded As Safe” by the FDA). It lasts up to three times longer than other goose deterrents. The repellent can be sprayed and is highly economical when fogged (fogging uses just 12 to 16 ounces per acre). Avian Control™ should be applied by a licensed pest control operator.

For additional advice on how to prevent bird strikes at your airport, consult an expert like the folks at Bird-B-Gone.

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Pigeons, poop and rats creating a stink by Bridge of Lions

Monday, July 30th, 2012

Article Shared From: St Augustine.com

From staff

The pigeons are causing a stink near the Bridge of Lions, and they’re bringing the rats with them.

The St. Augustine Police Department is asking people to help stop the problem by no longer feeding the birds.

According to the department, people have been putting bags of bird feed on the sidewalk near the Bridge of Lions. Those good intentions are causing a problem. (more…)

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Repeller 360° Uses Wind power to Prevent Birds from Landing on Solar Panels

Friday, July 20th, 2012

Mission Viejo CA – Bird-B-Gone, Inc. would like to announce the addition of a new product, The Repeller 360°.

The Repeller 360° is a physical bird deterrent that rotates in the wind to deter large birds from landing on unwanted areas such as solar panels, A.C. units, rooftops, exterior building equipment and more.

Covering a 6 ft diameter, the Repeller 360° features reflective “predator eyes” to confuse and scare birds from coming near the protected area. The rotating arms work to “sweep” birds off surfaces, while the reflective predator eyes create a visual scare zone that birds will want to avoid.
(more…)

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Fundraising under way for pigeon control

Tuesday, July 17th, 2012

Article Shared From: The Star Herald

Written By: MAUNETTE LOEKS Staff Reporter

An initiative of the downtown revitalization project will include ridding the downtown of pests — pigeons.

For years, downtown business owners have complained about pigeons roosting in the downtown community. Efforts to rid downtown of the pigeons have not been successful, including demolition of the former Hergert Mill property made possible by Neighborhood Stabilization grant funding.

Instead, the pigeons have continued to call the downtown home. (more…)

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Pigeons cause structural damage on bridge

Tuesday, July 10th, 2012

Bridge pigeons’ days are numbered 

Article Shared From: The Otago Daily Times / NZ

Written By: Sarah Marquet

Pigeon poo is threatening the Alexandra bridge across the Clutha River, so the birds have to go.

New Zealand Transport Agency (NZTA) senior asset manager John Jarvis said the bridge’s structural steel was being corroded and, while it was not an immediate safety risk, action was needed to reduce the 400-strong flock of resident pigeons so damaged areas could be repaired.

The corrosion mostly affected the surface, but there were also some cases of pitting. (more…)

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Next Bird-B-Gone University Class August 24th

Friday, July 6th, 2012

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Bird-B-Gone University is a FREE training course

designed to teach the basics of bird control

If you’re looking to expand your business by adding bird control, or just want to develop your bird control knowledge, this is an excellent opportunity for you!

Bird-B-Gone is the leading manufacturer of professional grade bird deterrents. We pride ourselves on our level of commitment to customer service and provide superior training and support.

Those who attend receive a certificate of completion and are eligible to apply to become a Bird-B-Gone Authorized Installer. Attendees who work in California will receive credits towards their branch II SPCB license.

The next class is Friday, August 24th, 2012

Classes are held at the Bird-B-Gone manufacturing facility in Santa Ana, California from 8:00am-5:00pm with a complimentary lunch and refreshments. The all-day course includes:

net instalation

  • Free training manual for future reference
  • Bird control products basics for success
  • How to market and make a profit in bird control
  • Choosing the right product
  • How to install products/ hands on training
  • Quoting bird jobs
  • How to hang bird netting
  • How to avoid problems / troubleshooting

 

Learn from the worlds leading manufacturer of bird control products!

Classes fill up quickly, contact Chris Fields today at 1-800-392-6915 or email chris@birdbgone.com to reserve your seat! 

Bird Spikes Stainless Steel   TileRoof    Bird Netting 

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