Posts Tagged ‘humane bird control’

Tragic Plane Crash Blamed on Bird Strike

Wednesday, October 3rd, 2012

Bird strikes at airports are not uncommon and can end in tragedy. The Telegraph recently reported a plane crash in Napal that took the lives of 19 people when a vulture flew into one of the engines as the plane was taking off. Tragedies like these underscore the importance of effective bird control.

Civil Aviation Authority officials noted that the pilot was forced to make an emergency landing after the plane’s front engine had been hit by a bird and ceased to function. After trying to start a second engine, the damaged engine burst into flames. When the pilot attempted to land in the nearby Monahara River (to snuff out the flames), the plane crashed into a soccer fi eld on the riverbank and was engulfed in thick, black flames. The plane crashed just 500 meters from the airport. Luckily no one was on the ground in the plane’s path. It took firefighters over 40 minutes to extinguish the flames.

It was later determined that the bird was not sucked into the engine, but hit the right side propeller. A local engineer noted that 90 percent of bird strikes occur during ta keoff. Bird collisions can result in aircraft damage, especially if the bird is large and is ingested into a jet engine. In this case, a bird will damage a fan blade in the engine, which causes adjacent blades to displace and impact all the blades in the engine. Without effective bird control measures, airports are literally at the mercy of pest birds. 

Keeping Aircraft Hangars Bird Free With Bird Netting

Since most aircraft hangars are wide open during operating hours, birds can easily flock around door openings, overhangs, eaves, canopies, support beams and other lofty areas. Birds attracted to hangars include European starlings, house sparrows and pigeons. Once they begin to nest inside, their droppings and nesting materials can easily fall onto aircraft engines, maintenance  and testing areas, and parts storage bays. Parts contaminated with bird debris can fail during testing and even cause mishaps during flight. Workers can also slip and fall on bird droppings.

One popular bird deterrent currently used to keep birds out of aircraft hangars is Heavy Duty Bird Netting.  Correctly installed by Authorized Bird Control Installers, bird netting effectively prevents birds from accessing sensitive areas.  Heavy duty bird netting comes in a variety of mesh sizes. To block out pigeons or seagulls, consider using 1-1/8- to 2-inch mesh size netting. To seal out smaller birds like sparrows, a 3/4-inch mesh netting is recommended.

Bird control experts will tell you that it’s important to specify high quality netting. The best heavy duty netting is made of high-strength polyethylene. One manufacturer offers netting that has a burst strength of up to 40 pounds. It meets ISO 1806 and 9001 protocols, is UV stabilized, flame resistant and rot- and water-proof. The best netting will have a 250-degree Fahrenheit melting point and will also remain intact in “sub-zero” temperatures. This netting is black, comes with a 10-year guarantee and is virtually invisible when properly installed.

Installing heavy duty netting in aircraft hangars should be done properly by Authorized Bird Control Installers. Such installations typically require thousands of square feet of netting. For example, to properly install the netting horizontally across an entire hangar ceiling, special boom lifts and power gear are required. Improperly installed netting can droop and sag, allowing birds to enter through spaces.

Heavy Duty Pond Netting for Wetland Areas

Properly installed, Heavy Duty Pond Netting creates a physical barrier that prevents migratory birds from landing in ponds or other water areas around aviation facilities. The netting is made from a durable, UV-stabilized Dupont® knotted mesh nylon and designed for prolonged use in harsh environments. The netting comes in large stock sizes and custom cuts. Mesh sizes vary from 3/4” to 4” to exclude a variety of large and medium sized migrating birds.

Avian Control™ Bird Repellent

Ideal for repelling birds from large expansive areas like airports, Avian Control™ Bird Repellent is a non-toxic solution that discourages geese, gulls ducks starlings and other birds from gathering and grazing.  Avian Control’s unique patent pending formula irritates the mucous membranes of birds, yet it’s harmless to birds, pets and people (all ingredients are considered “Generally Regarded As Safe” by the FDA). It lasts up to three times longer than other goose deterrents. The repellent can be sprayed and is highly economical when fogged (fogging uses just 12 to 16 ounces per acre). Avian Control™ should be applied by a licensed pest control operator.

For additional advice on how to prevent bird strikes at your airport, consult an expert like the folks at Bird-B-Gone.

Share

Repeller 360° Uses Wind Power to Prevent Birds from Landing

Monday, July 2nd, 2012

Mission Viejo CA – Bird-B-Gone, Inc. leading manufacturer of effective, humane bird deterrents would like to announce the addition of a new product, The Repeller 360.

The Repeller 360° is a physical bird deterrent that rotates in the wind to deter large birds from landing in unwanted areas such as boats, docks, signs, rooftops, A.C. units and more.

Covering a 6 ft diameter, the Repeller 360° features reflective “predator eyes” to confuse and scare birds from coming near the protected area. The arms work to “sweep” birds off surfaces, while the reflective predator eyes create a visual scare zone that birds will want to avoid. (more…)

Share

Bird-B-Gone Celebrates 20th Anniversary

Tuesday, June 26th, 2012

Mission Viejo, CABird-B-Gone, Inc. leading manufacturer of professional grade bird deterrents celebrated their 20-year anniversary, June 21st 2012.

Bird-B-Gone supplies the commercial, industrial and residential market with effective, humane bird deterrents manufactured in the USA.

In 1992, Bird-B-Gone started in the home of owners Bruce and Julie Donoho with little more than a school desk, a phone and a fax machine. Today, they supply the world with professional grade bird control products in nearly every major city across the globe. (more…)

Share

How to Market Your Bird Control Services

Wednesday, May 16th, 2012

Written By: Meredith Walako 5-16-12 / Bird-B-Gone, Inc.

Marketing – for some business owners and operators this can be a frightening term. With all of the new platforms (and more popping up every day) it can be a bit overwhelming, especially if you  are already looking at a full plate.

Adding bird control services is a lucrative way to bring in some extra revenue for Pest or Wildlife Control businesses and other service companies. But how do you get the word out that you do “bird work“? Today, marketing is all about being creative, resourceful, and original – and its easier (and cheaper) than you’d think.  Thanks to the internet, there are many free avenues to help let people know that you can help solve a bird problem – too. You can also still rely on some conventional marketing strategies. With a little foresight and planing, you can start your bird control marketing campaign today. (more…)

Share

Bird-B-Gone, Inc. Launches New Website

Tuesday, May 8th, 2012

Mission Viejo, CA (PRWEB) May 08, 2012

Bird-B-Gone, Inc. leading manufacturer of professional grade bird deterrents would like to announce the launch of their newly designed website.

Bird-B-Gone supplies the commercial, industrial and residential market with effective, humane bird deterrents manufactured in the USA. Beyond offering high quality products with industry leading guarantees, the company prides itself on the level of customer service, support and free training provided to customers.

The new, improved website will be a helpful resource to pest control and wildlife professionals or anyone looking to deter birds from their property. The site offers specific information for nearly every industry affected by pest birds. (more…)

Share

Bird Control is an Investment: Pest Birds Cost Businesses Every Year

Friday, May 4th, 2012

From Bird-B-Gone: We wrote this article a few years back but feel it is still very relevant in the world of bird control.  At Bird-B-Gone it is our goal to offer realistic advice when it comes to deterring birds commercial, industrial or residential settings. If you have a bird problem at your facility, please contact us at 1-800-392-6915 or email nobirds@birdbgone.com for advice.

Bird Control is an INVESTMENT? Pest Birds Cost Businesses Every Year

Bird Control?  Why should we care about pest birds?  It seems the latest issue concerning property management and building maintenance companies is Pest Birds.  Every year millions of dollars are spent cleaning up after and repairing the damage caused by pest birds such as pigeons, sea gulls, crows and other urban birds.  Not only are these problems unsightly, but also pest birds and their feces can spread 60 plus transmittable diseases.  Safety, sanitation and health hazards caused by bird droppings can pose serious liability risks, and left untreated, can lead to accidents and lawsuits.  Bird feces, bird nests and debris can also create a bad public image with tenants and patrons.
(more…)

Share

Bird-B-Gone Ornithologist Featured in Pest Control Technology Magazine

Monday, April 30th, 2012

Article shared from: PCT Magazine

Bird Whisperer

Features – Bird Control

Bird-B-Gone Ornithologist Rob Fergus has spent a lifetime understanding our “feathered friends” and he’s more than happy to share his insights with the industry.

PCT Magazine | April 30, 2012 |

Editor’s Note: Bobby Corrigan is considered the industry’s foremost “rodentologist” but when it comes to understanding the biology and behavior of birds that honor may go to Dr. Rob Fergus, an ornithologist with Bird-B-Gone, Mission Viejo, Calif. PCT magazine recently interviewed Fergus, who has a Ph.D. in urban bird conservation from the University of Texas, about the challenges of managing bird populations in urban settings, as well as the science of ornithology.

In layman’s terms, how would you describe what an ornithologist does on a daily basis?

A. An ornithologist is anyone who is involved with the scientific study of birds, which can cover anything from their DNA, anatomy and behavior to their ecology and distribution. Some ornithologists study birds or their genes in a lab, while others study free-flying birds in the wild. Academic ornithologists also spend a lot of time teaching university courses on birds, biology or ecology. Most of us do a little of all of this, so on any given day I will be out in the field observing bird behavior, corresponding with other researchers, as well as preparing or teaching university courses. My work with Bird-B-Gone involves field work studying nuisance bird behavior, as well as researching potential bird control solutions, and consulting on commercial and residential bird nuisance problems across the United States and around the world. (more…)

Share

New study overturns prevailing theory of how birds navigate

Wednesday, April 18th, 2012

Article Shared From: Bird Watching Daily

Posted Wed, Apr 11 2012 11:47 AM by Matt Mendenhall

Scientists have thrown cold water on the theory that iron-rich nerve cells in birds’ bills help them navigate using Earth’s magnetic field.

Researchers from Austria, France, Australia, and England, writing in a new study published today in Nature, report that iron-rich cells in the bills of pigeons are in fact specialized white blood cells called macrophages. Macrophages play a vital role in defending against infection and recycling iron from red blood cells, but they’re unlikely to be involved in magnetic sensing, the scientists say. That’s because they are not excitable cells and cannot produce electrical signals that could be registered by neurons and therefore influence a bird’s behavior.
(more…)

Share

Bird Spikes Added to Radio Communication Tower

Tuesday, April 10th, 2012

Adding anti perching devices/ bird spikes to new towers is now a USDA Forest Services guideline for bird conservation in Southern California 

Blog & photo’s shared from: Earth Signals

Tepusquet Peak Anti-Perching and Flight Diverter Devices

These photographs are from the government site on Tepusquet Peak in Santa Barbara County, CA.  Anti-perching and bird flight diverter devices have been added to bring the site into compliance with Forest Service Appendix G. Shown are anti-perching wire spikes on the perimeter of a building roof and flight diverter metal coils that have been added to guy wires to hopefully alert birds to the presence of the wires.

In addition, Appendix G requires that anti-perching devices be added to microwave dish tops, cable tray tops and certain other long horizontal members.  All microwave dishes must now be randomly covered and new towers are limited to 199 feet in height above ground.  Photographs posted April 2012.

See the original post from Earth Signals and additional pictures HERE

 

Share

Spring Bird Proofing with Bird Slope

Wednesday, April 4th, 2012

Written By: Alex Kecskes 

Spring is here and pest birds will be looking for a place to roost and nest. Better hope they don’t land on your property. If they do, you’re in for some major headaches.  For once they’ve settled on your commercial building or warehouse, hello expensive cleanups and repairs and goodbye peace and quiet. Here ‘s just one problem you’ll be facing if pest birds get the upper hand–and one way you can prevent it.

Problem: When pest birds lay claim to your commercial  property, they’ll nest, eat and poop. This poop is not just unsightly, the acid produced by the fungi that live in bird droppings can corrode metal and erode stone. It can jam up windows, doors, rooftop ventilators and skylights. Bird droppings can also block out those skylights. And it can render security cameras inoperative.  In fact, if allowed to collect, bird droppings can damage expensive A.C. units (you know how costly they are).

To keep up with birds and their droppings, you’ll have to hire expensive cleaning crews. Bird nests and droppings can also clog gutters and down pipes, causing rooftops to overflow with water. Some roof sections have actually collapsed due to bird damage. (more…)

Share

How to Install Bird Spikes

Thursday, March 8th, 2012

8" Wide Stainless Steel Bird Spikes

Bird Spikes are used to prevent large birds  such as pigeons, gulls and crows from landing on flat or curved surfaces.

Bird spikes do not harm birds, they simple create an uneven surface that birds cannot land on. Installing bird spikes is an effective, humane and economic solution for preventing birds from landing.

Bird-B-Gone Bird Spikes are proudly made in the USA and carry industry leading guarantees! (more…)

Share

Businesses fighting pigeon problem

Wednesday, February 29th, 2012
Article Shared From: Portales News Tribune  

Since the great-tailed grackles took flight in January, businessmen and local residents still haven’t seen many signs of them returning.

But the absence of those pests has made an avenue for another.

Pigeons and doves have become more of an issue recently for local businesses and their customers, according to Portales Public Work Director John DeSha.

“Pigeons have always been there, and now that (the grackles) are gone, there are a lot pigeons appearing and more people are noticing them,” said DeSha. (more…)

Share

Bird-B-Gone Chosen as “Office of the Day” for Los Angeles Radio Station K-Earth 101

Tuesday, February 28th, 2012

From the K-EARTH 101 Website:

Congrats to Fran and her coworkers at Bird-B-Gone in Irvine for being today’s office of the day! Antonio sang a special for the office while treating them to coffee and bagels for a morning break!

Make sure you sign your office up to be the K-EARTH 101 Morning Show’s office of the day! To see other Office of the Day winning offices, click here.

Listen to our on air interview: HERE

 

Share

Bird-B-Gone Featured in Quality Assurance Magazine’s “10 Proactive Steps to Prevent Pests”

Tuesday, February 14th, 2012

Check “Preventing Bird Invasions” on Page 52!

 

Look inside >
50 51
Pest Prevention
Share

Bird-B-Gone: No Gimmicks, Just Products That Work!

Tuesday, February 14th, 2012

At Bird-B-Gone,  we measure our success by the success we create for our customers. We respect our clients and potential customers enough to let them know that certain bird control products will not work for every situation.

Our goal is not to simply sell products, but to help solve bird problems, effectively, humanely and economically. We pride ourselves on our commitment to training and customer service and give our customers real answers when it comes to choosing the right product for the right situation.

We encourage customers to call in for advice on choosing the correct product depending on the species of bird, their behavior and the area they are posing a problem. At Bird-B-Gone we know that often our customers reputation is on the line, it’s our goal to help them make the best decisions when handling a bird problem for their clients – to help avoid that dreaded call back.

At Bird-B-Gone we are committed to giving realistic insight on handling specific bird problems. We stand behind our products and offer free training and support for all aspects of bird control. Our high quality professional grade bird deterrents are manufactured in the US and carry industry leading guarantees.  Call us today at 1-800-392-6915 or email nobirds@birdbgone.com to learn more.

Share

Protect Migrating Birds from Collection Ponds with Bird-B-Gone’s Heavy Duty Pond Netting

Friday, February 10th, 2012

Mission Viejo, CA – Bird-B-Gone, Inc. leading manufacturer of effective, humane bird deterrents  would like to announce a new addition to their line of professional grade bird control products, Heavy Duty Pond Netting.

Recent studies have shown that every year, thousands of protected migratory birds die in tailing or detention ponds used for industrial waste or filtering. Birds mistake these ponds for fresh water and often become poisoned by toxins present in the water.

Pond Netting is used as a physical barrier to prevent birds from landing in toxic tailing ponds or other water collection sites. The netting is stretched over these areas to prevent bird deaths. Installing pond netting will not only protect birds, but will also prevent the hefty fines associated with migratory bird deaths. (more…)

Share

Pigeon problems: If you kill them, more will come

Monday, February 6th, 2012

Why installing physical bird deterrents is a better bet for effective bird control.

Article Shared From: The Johnson City Press

Published February 6, 2012
By Amanda Marsh- Press Staff Writer

They’ll be back.

That’s what some are saying about the problematic pigeon population at the Washington County Courthouse in downtown Jonesborough.

In an effort to prevent the birds from roosting at the historic building, Jonesborough’s Historic Zoning Commission voted to remove the louvers from the backside of the building so there would be less places for the birds to gather and bird spikes were also placed on several ledges of the courthouse. Last month, county officials also decided to allow the USDA Wildlife Services Division to administer a toxicant to the birds that will kill them in one to three days.

Laura Simon, field director of urban wildlife for the Humane Society of the United States, says these steps will not rid the building of its pigeon plight.

“The solution they have chosen is absolutely senseless and biologically inappropriate,” Simon said. “If you poison them, more pigeons are going to fly in and use the structure.” (more…)

Share

Thinking Inside the Big Box – Article About Bird Control in Big Box Stores

Tuesday, January 31st, 2012

Article Shared From: Pest Management Professional Magazine

Written By: Stuart Aust – Contributor for PMP Magazine

Look inside >
60 61
Thinking Inside the Box
Share

Birds Invade Town: La Grange, Ky. Swarmed By Black Birds

Monday, January 30th, 2012

Article Shared From: The Huffington Post

First Posted: 01/26/2012 11:03 am Updated: 01/26/2012 11:03 am

Residents in a Kentucky town are saying “Get the flock out of here” to thousands of black birds that fill the sky each night.

At dusk, the birds take flight in La Grange, Ky., and create what some locals describe as a “cloud of birds,” according to TV station WAVE. The birds nest down in a wooded area for the night and depart each morning in a huge pack, reports said.

Fine-feathered friends, they’re not. Residents complain that they’re constantly cleaning up after the avian arrivistes, who started showing up last November in the community northeast of Louisville. Nearly everyone has heard their town compared to Alfred Hitchcock’s classic film “The Birds.”

To protect themselves from bird poop, some people have begun carrying umbrellas, even on sunny days, CNN reports. (more…)

Share

Obstruction Lights 101 – Use Bird Spikes to Prevent Birds From Landing

Tuesday, January 24th, 2012

Article Shared From: Wind Power Engineering and Development Magazine

Written By: 1/24/12

Flashing warning lights on turbine nacelles are mostly for the benefit of aircraft flying at night. The lights have progressed from incandescent to LEDbased units. The features of several recent lights show advanced systems.

twr wholeThe L450-864-G from TWR Lighting is one type of obstruction light for wind turbines. 

One model of obstruction light comes in a one-piece mount. An internal enclosure houses the flash circuitry and GPS synchronization circuitry, so it can synch up with other lights of the same model in the vicinity. A bird spike on the dome discourages its use as a resting pad. The light’s beam projects 360° with a 3° divergence at 50% peak vertical. The 33-lb light comes with a regulated power supply with over-voltage protection, and contacts for monitoring and alarms. An internal photocell eliminates need for an external one, and it runs on 100 to 240 Vac.

Another light features a compact flash head to reduce wind load on fixed obstructions such as wind turbines, towers, and bridges. Operating at just 20W, the series of lights is said to offer the lowest power consumption of any L-864 product (FAA designation for a flashing red obstruction light, 20 to 40 flashes per minute) to help save energy and reduce operating costs. With less than an 8.5-in. height, the shock and vibration-resistant lights offer a low profile to reduce the impact of wind shear on the mounting structure, making it well-suited for high-altitude applications and improved performance in inclement weather.

Read the complete article from Windpower Engineering and Development Magazine HERE

 

Share
Get Adobe Flash player