Posts Tagged ‘how to get rid of birds’

3 Reasons to Invest in Bird Control Products

Monday, March 3rd, 2014

bird controlBird Control

When birds land, roost and nest on your property they create a hazardous, unsightly and costly mess. Here are three reasons why bird control is a great investment and a few products that can be used to solve your bird control problem.

Transmittable Disease
Bird droppings carry any of 60 transmittable diseases that are easy for humans to contract. Nesting materials are just as infectious as bird droppings as they have bugs, mites and remnants of bird droppings.

Cost of Clean Up
Eliminate costly clean up created by pest birds’ messy lifestyle. Depending on how long birds have been nesting in an area, there could be thousands of dollars in damage and clean up. Bird droppings contain acidic substances that can stain or corrode certain building materials if left unattended.

Slip & Fall Risk
Bird droppings are messy and slippery. If bird droppings are on walkways or entryways, there is the risk of someone slipping and falling, which could result in injury and a lawsuit if it’s on at a business or on public property.

Bird Control Products
Bird Spikes are used to prevent large birds, like pigeons, crows and gulls, from landing or perching on unwanted areas. They will not harm birds. Bird spikes simply create an uneven surface making it impossible for large birds to land. The spike strips come in two foot sections and a variety of widths to cover the area width in need of protection. The base of the spike is 1.5” and has predrilled holes for quick and easy installation. The spikes are easy to install by gluing, screwing or tying them down. Bird spikes come in stainless steel with a polycarbonate base or polycarbonate. The plastic is

Bird Netting is a full exclusion bird control product. Heavy duty bird netting creates a physical barrier to prevent birds from landing or nesting. It is the most efficient and effective method for excluding birds to ensure they cannot access an area to build or rebuild their nests. This product is effective for all bird species. Use a U.V. stabilized polyethylene mesh bird net that is sun and weather resistant and rot proof. Depending on the pest bird, there are different mesh sizes available: ¾” 1 1/8” and 2”.

Bird Jolt Flat Track is a low profile, electrical track system that produces a mild electrical shock when birds land on its surface. The shock will not harm birds, but will condition them to stay away from the area, making Bird Jolt Flat Track the ultimate in bird behavior modification. Bird Jolt Flat Track is the only electric track bird deterrent system with patented anti-arcing and glue trough designs and is the safest most effective electric track available. It is also available in six colors: clear, black, grey, stone, terra cotta, and red.

The choice to invest in bird control can save you time, money and potentially hazardous situations.

Share

Bird-B-Gone University for Bird Control Scores High in Recent Audit

Thursday, January 16th, 2014

Bird Control Training

Bird-B-Gone Inc.’s Bird-B-Gone University was recently audited for review and approval by the California Department of Pesticide Regulation (DPR). Bird-B-Gone received excellent remarks from the DPR as a four hour Continuing Education (CE) credit in Bird Control training.

Bird-B-Gone University, a bird control training course offered by Bird-B-Gone, was recently audited by the Department of Pesticide Regulation. The course covers many things commercial bird control installers need to know. The course qualifies as a continuing education course through the DPR.  Bird-B-Gone provides this free training at their facilities in Santa Ana, CA at least every other month.

Mike Dougherty, a bird control engineer at Bird-B-Gone, was well received as the presenter of this course.  “Mr. Dougherty was very knowledgeable in the subject matter and provided useful pesticide and pest management information,” says Lisa Estridge, Environmental Scientist with the DPR. “He presented bird management from an IPM perspective and encouraged attendees to use a variety of bird control methods, such as exclusion, sanitation and mechanical tools. His presentation included a PowerPoint presentation, photographs, sample products and anecdotes that made the course more relatable to the attendees.”

Bird-B-Gone University is designed to ensure pest control operators are equipped with the necessary knowledge and tools to properly install Bird-B-Gone bird control products. “All questions from the attendees were answered quickly and accurately. In addition, the course materials and comfortable facility, along with the announcement at the beginning of the course to silence cell phones, created an environment conducive to learning. Overall, the course was informative and well received by the attendees,” says Estridge.

To learn more about becoming an Authorized Installer of Bird-B-Gone’s bird control products click here.

Share

Keep Birds Off Awnings with Plastic Bird Spikes

Wednesday, December 18th, 2013

pest bird deterrentBird Deterrents for Bird Control

Birds enjoy landing and roosting on awnings, especially if there is food to be scavenged. They leave behind a mess of droppings. This creates an unpleasant and unsanitary situation for customers. This mess can also stain or ruin awnings. Keep birds off awnings with bird control deterrents like bird spikes.

The best time to get rid of pest birds is when the first start coming around. Don’t assume they will leave on their own. If the area provides the right scenario, they may become frequent visitors. Polycarbonate bird spikes are great for awnings. Install the plastic bird spikes on the edge of the awning, where the birds enjoy sitting. The spikes create an uneven surface, making it impossible for the birds to land in the treated area. The birds will learn the area is no longer appealing and move on to a better landing spot.

Plastic bird pikes are available in different spike widths: 3”, 5” and 7” to cover different ledge and surface widths. Choose from seven colors: clear, white, tan, grey, brown, black and brick red. The bird spikes are made of a U.V. protected polycarbonate plastic. Since the spikes come pre-assembled in two foot strips with pre-drilled holes along the base, installation is fast and easy – cutting installation time in half. Plastic spikes can be glued or screwed to most surfaces.

Share

Plastic Bird Spikes to Deter Birds from Ledges

Tuesday, November 26th, 2013

deter birds Deter Birds from Ledges

Larger birds, like pigeons, seagulls and crows land in areas where they are not wanted, creating a mess and an unsanitary environment. Ledges make the perfect landing spot for birds to roost and look for food and predators. They leave behind a nasty mess of bird droppings, however.  Deter birds from landing on ledges with polycarbonate bird spikes. Plastic bird spikes work well to keep birds away by creating an uneven surface, making it impossible for birds to land on the treated area. The spikes are humane and will not harm the birds.

Polycarbonate bird spikes work on flat or curved signs. Choose from seven colors: clear, white, tan, grey, brown, black and brick red. Plastic spikes are available in different spike widths: 3”, 5” and 7” to cover different ledge and surface widths. Since the spikes come pre-assembled in two foot strips with pre-drilled holes along the base, installation is fast and easy – cutting time to install in half. Plastic spikes can be glued or screwed to most surfaces.

Bird-B-Gone polycarbonate spikes are manufactured in the USA and carry a five year guarantee.

Share

Keep Pest Birds off Your Storefront with Bird Spikes

Friday, November 15th, 2013

deter pest birds with bird spikesUse Bird Spikes to Deter Pest Birds

Pest birds can also literally drive away customers, swooping down on them from the elevated perches of your store. No one likes to visit a store where birds are dive bombing them as they try to enter or leave. There’s also the nuisance of bird droppings, which can cover everything from windows, awnings and canopies to signage, doorknobs and walkways.

The solution, of course, is to employ some sort of bird control. One of the best bird control measures available today is bird spikes. Recommended for pigeons and other large birds, bird spikes have been used by thousands of store owners nationwide. They are easy to install and, in some cases, blend in with their surroundings to make them practically invisible.

Bird spikes remain an effective pest bird deterrent because they prevent pest birds from landing.  No bird wants to get its wings tangled in a splay of nasty looking spikes. Better to simply find another, more bird-friendly landing area. Rest assured, the blunted spikes are safe and won’t harm our fine-feathered friends–they have been approved by a number of humane groups worldwide, including the U.S. Humane Society and PICAS (Pigeon Control Advisory Service).

Bird spikes come in strong, rigid polycarbonate or flexible stainless steel. Stainless steel bird spikes are available in 3-, 5- and 8-inch widths to cover areas up to 8 inches wide; plastic spikes come in 3-, 5- and 7-inch widths to protect areas up to 7 inches wide. The best spikes will provide many years of dependable deterrence, for they are made of marine-grade stainless steel and feature a U.V.-protected polycarbonate base. Some bird pikes come with a non-reflective metal finish, which means they won’t stand out on your roofline or parapet wall. You can even get spikes in a variety of colors to match your store’s signage, awnings or fixed canopies. Available colors include white, tan, gray, black, brown, brick red and crystal clear.

Pest birds often gather in rain gutters. In this case use Gutter Spikes. These specially designed bird spikes will keep pest birds out of your rain gutters. The spikes feature adjustable clamps at the base, which makes it easy to install them to the lip of a gutter.

Share

Electric Flat Track Bird Repellent

Wednesday, November 6th, 2013

bird repellentBird Repellent: Electric Flat Track System

Birds often land and roost in areas where they are not wanted. If you or your customer has a bird problem in an area where visual appearance is important, a bird repellent that is less conspicuous might be a good solution. Bird Jolt Flat Track is a physical bird deterrent that is virtually invisible, making it perfect in areas where visual appearance matters.

Bird Jolt Flat Track conditions birds to stay away from unwanted areas by giving off a mild electrical shock when they attempt to land on the treated area. The shock will not harm birds; it alters their behavioral patterns to associate the unpleasant feeling with the treated area, causing birds to stay away. The system will deter any size bird and works on buildings, signs, eaves and most high-profile areas birds land and roost. This electric track bird deterrent system has multi-patented anti-arcing and glue through designs.

Bird Jolt Flat Track is and now available in six different colors, –clear, grey, stone, black, terracotta and target red– to match most building materials.

Share

What It Means To Be An Authorized Installer

Wednesday, September 11th, 2013

authorized installerWhen it comes to bird control, anyone can determine whether or not a bird problem exists, but that doesn’t get you too far unless you are a certified bird control expert. Without understanding and being able to identify the details of bird problems, it could be anyone’s guess as to what the real issues is and what it will take to resolve the problem.

Being properly trained is a key component to becoming a certified bird control expert. Being trained as a bird control expert equips you with the tools to assess a situation, analyze the bird species and behavior, ask the right questions, recommend a solution(s) and implement the solution. If you are evaluating a bird control problem with no expertise, you might find that while you can identify certain aspects of the problem, the whole picture isn’t always revealed unless you have been trained to look for certain details and to ask specific questions. One of the most common errors to stem from lack of training is recommending the wrong product or solution.

Know What to Look For & Ask the Right Questions:

Being properly trained allows you to identify and analyze every aspect of the situation, starting with asking the right questions.
1.    What type of bird? Identifying the species of bird is paramount in determining a solution. Different bird species have different behavior patterns so it’s important to understand the type bird you are dealing with. Additionally, not all bird control products are effective in deterring all bird species.
2.    Where are they? Knowing where the birds are located on the premises is another key component to providing a solution. Birds on a roof are a different problem from birds gathering around an entryway. Certain products that are recommended for roofs and ledges would not be applicable to the walkway outside a building or office.
3.    What are they doing? Bird behavior on the premises is just as important as knowing where they are located. If a bird is nesting, a completely different course of action may be taken than if the birds are landing or roosting.
4.    How many? The last major question to ask customers is how many birds there are. A few birds could be cause for a single product whereas dozens of birds might require multiple products.

Often times the customer will not know all the answers so doing a site evaluation is best when possible.

Recommending A Solution:

Depending on the Q/A session or site evaluation, a single product may be suggested or an integrated solution may be implemented.

Recommending a product or solution isn’t dependent only on the size of the bird; it is also based on behavior of the bird. If birds are nesting, full exclusivity is required to keep the birds entirely away from the nesting area. In this case bird netting or bird slope would be recommended to prevent birds from accessing the area. When birds are landing and roosting, however, other bird deterrents can be used: bird spikes, bird gel, bird jolt flat track and bird wire.

Share

Plastic Bird Spikes to Deter Birds from Signs

Tuesday, August 13th, 2013

get rid of birds with plastic bird spikesSigns are important to businesses and communities. We look at them every day so it’s important that signs represent the business or town in a clean and professional manner. Larger birds, like pigeons, seagulls and crows land in areas where they are not wanted, creating a mess and an unsanitary environment. Signs are no exception; birds will sit and poop on sings, ruining the visual appeal. Keep birds off signs with polycarbonate bird spikes. This will help you avoid unnecessary costs and potential health and legal issues. Plastic bird spikes work well to keep birds away by creating an uneven surface, making it impossible for birds to land in the treated area. The spikes will not harm the birds.

Polycarbonate bird spikes work on flat or curved signs. Choose from seven colors: clear, white, tan, grey, brown, black and brick red. Plastic spikes are available in different spike widths: 3”, 5” and 7” to cover different ledge and surface widths. Since the spikes come pre-assembled in two foot strips with pre-drilled holes along the base, installation is fast and easy – cutting time to install in half. Plastic spikes can be glued or screwed to most surfaces.

Bird-B-Gone polycarbonate spikes are manufactured in the USA and carry a five year guarantee.

Types of Bird Spikes
View more lists from Fran Prisco

Share

Get Rid of Large Birds with Polycarbonate Bird Spikes

Thursday, July 11th, 2013

get rid of birds plastic spikeLarger birds, like pigeons, seagulls and crows land in areas where they are not wanted, creating a mess and an unsanitary environment. Taking care of bird issues when they arise is pertinent to ensuring you avoid unnecessary costs and potential health and legal issues. Birds sitting and roosting on a ledge or other flat surface will require a physical bird deterrent to get rid of pest birds. Polycarbonate bird spikes work well to keep birds away by creating an uneven surface, making it impossible for birds to land in the treated area.

Polycarbonate bird spikes work on areas like beams, ledges, under eaves, rooftops and other flat or curved surfaces. Choose from seven colors: clear, white, tan, grey, brown, black and brick red. Plastic spikes are available in different spike widths: 3”, 5” and 7” to cover different ledge and surface widths. Since the spikes come pre-assembled in two foot strips with pre-drilled holes along the base, installation is fast and easy – cutting time to install in half. Plastic spikes can be glued or screwed to most surfaces.

Bird-B-Gone polycarbonate spikes are manufactured in the USA and carry a five year guarantee.

Share

Keep Birds Away with Repeller 360°™

Friday, June 14th, 2013

get rid of birdsLarge Birds, like crows, seagulls, pigeons, raptors and cormorants, enjoy landing and perching in inconvenient places. These pest birds create a mess and sometimes cause damage and health issues by pooping. Some of these areas are unique either because of the small surface area or it’s an area with foot traffic, so unique solutions are required to get rid of birds in these areas.

The Repeller 360° is perfect bird deterrent for boats, docks, canvas, light posts, air conditioning units, signs, rooftops and many other areas that are small in diameter, made of unique materials or on slanted areas. Made of durable stainless steel, the Repeller 360° is attached to a UV protected polycarbonate base that spins continuously in the wind. The arms extend up to 6 ft. in diameter and have a reflective predator eye at each end. As the Repeller 360° turns, the constant movement creates confusion and the predator eye scares birds, causing them to avoid the area.

The Repeller 360° locks into place with a patent pending clip to prevent loss in high winds. It is very easy to install and you can choose from a variety of bases, including the sandbag base, boat base or railing mount, to secure your Repeller 360° where it is needed to keep birds away.

Eliminate unsightly messes and stains! Get rid of birds!

The Repeller 360° is manufactured by Bird-B-Gone in the USA!

Share

Need to Keep Birds Out of Rafters? Bird Netting to the Rescue

Thursday, June 6th, 2013

keep birds off with bird nettingBirds love to sit and nest in high places that protect them from predators and weather. This means that places with open ceilings with beams and rafters, like warehouses or manufacturing facilities, are perfect for birds in search of a nesting area.

Birds will sit on beams, pooping and preening, which causes a huge mess but the acidic droppings can erode building materials. Bird droppings also carry up to 60 transmittable diseases and when dried can blow around in dust form and be inhaled by humans. Nesting also creates a mess and a hazard. Workers who have to climb in the rafters, to change lights for example, are at risk of being injured or picking up diseases. Additionally, droppings fall on equipment and product or anything produced in the open area facility, potentially damaging or ruining the expensive equipment and product.

This is a serious problem that must be addressed. The best way to keep birds out is to create a barrier that fully excludes birds from being able to enter the area altogether. Bird Netting is the perfect solution for getting rid of birds in your rafters. The best, most efficient and effective bird netting is the Bird Net 2000™, which provides 100% bird exclusion and is the #1 bird net specified by architects and government agencies. Depending on the size of your affected area, there are multiple options for bird netting

Bird netting requires professional installation and installation hardware. If you do not have an installer, we can connect you with authorized installers in your area to ensure your bird netting is properly installed and your bird problems are solved.

Share

FDA Find Bugs, Bird at Affiliate of Meningitis Pharmacy

Wednesday, December 26th, 2012

by Toni Clarke, Reuters (via The Chicago Tribune)

A sign for pharmaceutical compounding company NECC, a producer of the steroid methylprednisolone acetate, is seen in Framingham, Massachusetts. (Image credit: Jessica Rinaldi, Reuters)

(Reuters) – U.S. health inspectors found bugs, a flying bird and other unsterile conditions at Ameridose LLC, an affiliate of the Massachusetts compounding pharmacy at the heart of the deadly meningitis outbreak.

Westborough, Massachusetts-based Ameridose was closed on October 10 to allow state and federal investigators to inspect its facilities. On Monday the U.S. Food and Drug Administration released the results of its investigation.

The agency’s report details a list of quality control failures at Ameridose, including a failure to test the potency of its products, a failure to properly classify patient complaints and the use of “vague, canned language” when describing negative patient reactions to its drugs.

The company, an affiliate of the New England Compounding Center, said it is in the process of preparing a full response to the FDA.

“Ameridose’s history shows clearly that we have not had any instance of contaminated products over the course of the past six years, which covers the manufacture and shipment of 70 million units of product,” the company said in a statement. “Ameridose is committed to addressing all observations in order to enhance our existing systems.”

The investigation of Ameridose follows the closure of the NECC, which distributed thousands of vials of a steroid linked to an outbreak of fungal meningitis that has hit 19 states and claimed 32 lives.

Inspectors found that Ameridose failed to investigate customer complaints related to drug potency, under-filled products and syringe volumes. It also failed to classify “patient response” complaints as “adverse events.”

Several such complains referred to the drug oxytocin, used to induce labor in childbirth. One referred to “fetal distress and hyper stimulated uterus.” Another customer called to report an increase in post-partum hemorrhaging. Another reported that a patient had shortness of breath and that “the throat was closing.”

A complaint related to the painkiller fentanyl noted that the patient was “oversedated” and “unresponsive.” Another patient given the blood-thinner heparin experienced a “life-threatening” negative reaction.

Inspectors said buildings used to make, process, pack and hold the drugs were not maintained in a good state of repair. The firm failed to perform a microbiological assessment after “penetrating leaks” were found in a building and water dripping above the clean room.

“During the inspection we observed totes placed in the location of the penetrating leaks containing water,” the inspection report noted. “There is no documented evidence that the leaks were permanently corrected.”

Walls were cracked, corroded and covered with what appeared to be adhesive material in a room where sterile drugs are prepared, the report noted.

Equipment and utensils were not cleaned or sanitized at appropriate intervals to prevent contamination that could alter the safety, identity, quality or purity of the drugs, according to the report.

Certain metal surfaces “were observed to contain what appeared to be brownish structures, atypical in shape,” the report noted.

Moreover, the buildings used “are not free of infestation by rodents, birds, insects and other vermin,” the report said.

Specifically, insects were located in an area where finished sterile product is packaged and stored. The insects were also located within three to 10 feet of the controlled area where sterile products are manufactured.

At least one bird was observed flying in an area where sterile finished product is packaged and stored.

On Friday, Ameridose, which has the same owners as NECC, said it would lay off about 90 percent of its work force. About 650 employees at Ameridose will be affected, as well as 140 employees at Medical Sales Management, a company that provides sales, technology and human resources support to Ameridose.

Share

Oil company fined $22,500 over dead birds

Thursday, December 20th, 2012

BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) – A Denver-based oil company has pleaded guilty to violating federal law in the deaths of migratory birds in fluid pits at the company’s oil and gas drilling facilities in Montana, Wyoming and Nebraska and has been fined $22,500.

The U.S. Attorney’s Office in Montana said SM Energy Co. pleaded guilty Wednesday one misdemeanor count of violating the Migratory Bird Treaty Act in each state. U.S. Magistrate Carolyn Ostby also placed the company on probation for a year and ordered it to make a $7,500 payment to the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation.

The case dates back to 2005, when the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service documented deaths of a dozen migratory birds at uncovered open fluid pits at Nance Petroleum sites in Wyoming. Nance later become an SM Energy subsidiary.

Copyright 2012 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Share

Bird Flu Controlled in Mexico

Wednesday, December 19th, 2012

by Xinhua News Agency

Image credit: US EPA

Mexican President Felipe Calderon on Wednesday announced that the bird flu having broken out four months ago in the western Jalisco state has been “totally controlled.”

“After 68 days with no new cases reported, we are entering the stage of eradication” of the H7N3 virus, Calderon said at the presidential residence.

Mexico will recover very soon from the highly dangerous avian influenza, he said, stressing that the control of this disease is the result of “great effort of the government and producers.”

Among the measures, he said the culling of over 22 million chickens, the establishment of a sanitary cordon and the development of an “effective vaccine against the disease, are crucial to control the virus quickly and decisively.”

In the past months, “around 140 million doses of vaccine have been applied, and we also have a sufficient reserve bank to use if necessary,” the president said.

Thanks to efforts to restore the productive capacity of the farming, Mexico is expected to recover in November the number of laying hens to the level prior to the outbreak of the avian influenza, he said.

Calderon noted that the goal now is to stimulate the creation of new chicken producers’ centers in other parts of Mexico to diversify regional egg production and prevent such an impact in the future. However, Jaime Crivelli, president of the National Poultry Union, criticized the government for minimizing the impact of the bird flu on egg production.

As a response, Calderon said his government acted in time, because otherwise the damage to egg production would have been irreversible in his country, the fifth largest producer in the world and the largest per capita egg consumer.

He announced a support of $16.6 million (215 million pesos)in normalizing egg production and credits for those who want to engage in egg production.

The president noted that so far 65 percent of egg production has been restored. Besides, the country has imported nearly 14,000 tons of eggs, mainly from the United States, to meet demand.

Share

Battle to Protect Norwich’s Historic Buildings From Pigeons Widens

Tuesday, December 18th, 2012

by Richard Wheeler (via Norwich Evening News 24)

The battle to protect Norwich’s historic buildings from feathered invaders has intensified – as officials attempt to defend two more city attractions from their droppings.

How it could look if pigeons attacked Norwich Castle. (Image credit: Norwich Evening News 24)

Proposals to install pigeon-guarding systems have been put forward for the Bridewell and Shirehall, following a successful application for a similar idea at Norwich Castle. Mess on the pavement outside the Shirehall, in Market Avenue, below where the pigeons roost, affects access to the building for visitors according to planning documents from the Norfolk museums service.

The papers add that the droppings are also causing white staining to the stonework, which cleaning is “unlikely to remove”, as well as health and safety issues. At the Bridewell, the documents state the volume of pigeon waste creates a risk of “slipping on wet foul”.

Measures to deter pigeons from sills and ledges in the museum’s central courtyard were installed during a recent £1.5m refurbishment. But the plans reveal these are ineffective in many areas.

There are concerns at both sites that the mess stops workers being able to reach and clean out gutters and pipes to stop them getting blocked. There is a risk water could seep into the walls and damage the buildings’ walls if these are not unblocked.

Posts with thin wire on them are proposed for both buildings. These aim to stop pigeons from being able to roost or perch.

Museum officials are also bidding for cash to fund a similar defence system at Norwich Castle after the city council approved the plan. It is hoped these measures will protect the 11th century structure from further damage. The post and wire system was trialled and also checked by English Heritage before permission was granted, to try and ensure it will not ruin the appearance of the castle.

Stuart Garner, operations manager for Norwich museums, said: “We’ve had the pilot and we all agreed on the best way forward with English Heritage. We’ve got the majority of listed-building consent. Now, it’s preparing the documents for the funding.”

Mr Garner said it was Norfolk County Council’s responsibility to look after the attractions, but the city council has agreed to contribute 30pc toward the costs of pigeon-proofing them. No cost figures have yet to be made public.

Dr Will Fletcher, English Heritage’s inspector of ancient monuments in Norfolk, said it is difficult trying to protect historic buildings from pigeons.

But he said it involved pinpointing the ideal roosting locations and then installing new equipment without damaging the fabric of the building while ensuring it is “sympathetic” to its appearance.

Dr Fletcher said of the Norwich Castle plans: “It can all be taken away without damaging the fabric and leaving the castle intact.

“We will come back six to eight months or a year later down the line to see how effective it’s been.

“We are aware of the fact pigeons can be a problem elsewhere. We’ve talked about the issues, falconry and other options around the town but it pushes it from one place to another.

“There will be an ongoing issue and it’s really something for the people of Norwich to get involved in and we welcome their views.”

Share

Bird-B-Gone, Inc. Launches New Website

Tuesday, May 8th, 2012

Mission Viejo, CA (PRWEB) May 08, 2012

Bird-B-Gone, Inc. leading manufacturer of professional grade bird deterrents would like to announce the launch of their newly designed website.

Bird-B-Gone supplies the commercial, industrial and residential market with effective, humane bird deterrents manufactured in the USA. Beyond offering high quality products with industry leading guarantees, the company prides itself on the level of customer service, support and free training provided to customers.

The new, improved website will be a helpful resource to pest control and wildlife professionals or anyone looking to deter birds from their property. The site offers specific information for nearly every industry affected by pest birds. (more…)

Share

Bird Proofing an Integral Part of Building Maintenance

Friday, April 8th, 2011

Like everything else you own or manage, buildings require regular maintenance to keep them from deteriorating. Regardless of the size of your building, certain specific tasks must be performed to ensure heating, cooling, ventilation, and air conditioning systems are operating properly and continue to meet health and safety codes. Bird proofing can prevent droppings, nests and other and other bird debris from damaging these important systems–systems that can be very costly to repair or replace.

 

Likewise, a building’s plumbing systems, drains, drinking fountains, sprinkler systems and the timers that control them must be kept free of bird droppings and other debris to function properly. The same holds true for outdoor walkways, tables and chairs used by employees. Bird proofing will keep disease-carrying droppings from contaminating these areas. They can also prevent costly litigation should someone slip and fall on bird droppings.

 

Exterior lighting and security cameras must be kept clear and fully functional to ensure the safety of visitors and employees. Bird droppings and nests can obscure and render these systems inoperative unless bird-proofing devices are installed. Similarly, exterior locks, doors and windows can jam up, leaving gaps in a building’s security and resulting in the need for expensive repairs.

 

Finally, roofs, exterior facades and signage can be seriously damaged by pest-bird droppings and nesting materials. Roofs, especially, can be prohibitively expensive to repair or replace. The acid in bird droppings can quickly eat into painted signs and plastic, ruin expensive entry monuments and artwork, and crumble stone facades. All the more reason to invest in bird proofing before damage occurs.

 

Bird Proofing Solutions

Today’s bird proofing solutions are humane and highly effective. Poisons and shotguns are out, scientifically designed bird deterrents are in. These are easy to install and virtually maintenance free. Most are visually unobtrusive and balance aesthetics with function.

 

Bird Spikes Get the Job Done

As an effective bird-proofing device, few deterrents come close to the Bird Spike. Birds have one heck of time trying to land anywhere near them. That’s because the menacing-looking spikes really intimidate most birds. The spikes come in stainless steel or rigid unbreakable polycarbonate. And while they look like they would impale a bird, the blunted spikes are harmless to birds or maintenance crews. Bird spikes can be used to deter a wide range of birds and work quite effectively on rooftops, signs, building ledges and other outdoor areas.

 

Bird Spiders for Smaller Areas

For smaller nooks crannies, there’s the Bird Spider. Like the bird spike, it keeps pest birds from landing and nesting. While bird spikes are motionless, a spider’s arms whip around in the breeze to catch a pest bird’s eye. Spiders come in different sizes (different length spider arms) to deter different bird species.

(more…)

Share

Bird Proofing Commercial Buildings

Thursday, September 17th, 2009

Birds-PoopUnlike homes and boats, commercial buildings suffer damage from pest birds on a grand scale. Commercial  building owners spend millions of dollars every year to deal with problems associated with pest birds. The only viable solution is bird proofing.

Failure to bird proof a commercial building can lead to all sorts of problems. The droppings pest birds leave seriously detract from a building’s appearance. The acid secretion produced by the fungi that live in bird droppings can mar paint and other surfaces. Cleaning and restoring buildings damaged by pest birds can be very expensive. Nests and droppings can, over time, clog gutters and down pipes, causing rooftops to leak or fill with water and possibly collapse. Pest bird nests and droppings can get sucked into ducts, grilles and vents, clogging commercial air conditioning and heating units, permanently damaging these expensive systems.

Bird droppings deposited at commercial building entrances and fire escapes increase the likelihood that pedestrians may slip and fall on them, creating a huge legal liability to commercial property owners. Droppings also spoil finished products in loading bays and storage areas. They ruin the appearance of costly finished goods, metal panels, and stonework. Droppings can also eat into and destroy wood, paper and cardboard packaging of products on pallets or outside storage.

(more…)

Share
Get Adobe Flash player