Warning: session_start() [function.session-start]: open(/home/content/78/4549178/tmp/sess_rbe6pdg8eh3im8i77h41jvio67, O_RDWR) failed: No such file or directory (2) in /home/content/78/4549178/html/wp-content/plugins/session-manager/includes/sm_functions.include.php on line 510

Warning: session_start() [function.session-start]: Cannot send session cookie - headers already sent by (output started at /home/content/78/4549178/html/wp-content/plugins/session-manager/includes/sm_functions.include.php:510) in /home/content/78/4549178/html/wp-content/plugins/session-manager/includes/sm_functions.include.php on line 510

Warning: session_start() [function.session-start]: Cannot send session cache limiter - headers already sent (output started at /home/content/78/4549178/html/wp-content/plugins/session-manager/includes/sm_functions.include.php:510) in /home/content/78/4549178/html/wp-content/plugins/session-manager/includes/sm_functions.include.php on line 510
Disease In Bird Droppings | Bird•B•Gone Blog

Posts Tagged ‘disease in bird droppings’

Chlorine suggested for water contaminated by bird droppings

Thursday, March 17th, 2011

Bird-B-Gone, Inc.

Last year the city of White Rock experienced an EColi water scare when a small amount of bird droppings – 1 to 4 grams – seeped into a water reservoir. Now the town is looking into chlorinating water supplies and installing bird deterrents:

From the Nownewspaper.com:

White Rock should add chlorine to make water safer, EPCOR says

By Marisa Babic, Surrey Now March 17, 2011

WHITE ROCK – As a result of the contaminated water scare in White Rock last summer, the company that supplies the city’s drinking water is recommending the addition of chlorine.

David Rector, director of operations for EPCOR, said the move is necessary to ensure the safety of the water supply.

“We’re recommending chlorination for all of White Rock,” Rector said Wednesday in presenting a report into the incident that led to a boil-water advisory for the city.

Fraser Health officials issued the boil-water advisory on Aug. 20, 2010 after water authorities discovered low-level E. coli contamination in the water supply during routine testing.

Rector said an investigation has found that a tiny amount of bird droppings that had seeped through a gap in the hatch seal at the Merklin reservoir were the probable cause of the contamination.

“The amount of material that we estimate caused this contamination is on the order of one to four grams,” he said.

Read the complete article here

Share

7 Ways Pest Birds Cause Damage

Monday, August 9th, 2010
The acid in bird droppings will eat into many tar-based roofing substrates. Without effective bird deterrent measures, these droppings will accumulate , allowing the acids to eventually perforate a roof and leave it vulnerable to leaks. Bird nest built under clay roofing tiles can also cause leaks when tiles are displaced.
Roof nests and nesting materials, especially those of pigeons, starlings and sparrows, are notorious for clogging rain gutters, drains and roof corners. Many industrial buildings with flat roofs suffer water build up and collapse during rains due to clogged  gutters and spouts. Proper bird control can keep birds out of gutters.
Nesting materials and acidic bird droppings can severely damage A.C. systems, vents and compressors. Rotating air circulation vents, skylights, and solar panels—all can be damaged to the point of inoperability. Bird droppings can block exterior security cameras and “freeze up” their motion servos. Bird deterrent measures help prevent this damage
If you’re looking to start a fire and need some good kindling , bird nests are ideal. The straw, twigs and dried droppings ignite at the slighted spark. Which is why bird nests inside electric signs or other machinery pose such an extreme fire hazard.
Bird nests built in chimneys and ventilation systems can create potentially lethal air blockages . Bird control is a must in these situations.
The acids in pigeon and gull droppings can eat into painted finishes on cars, BBQs, boats and anything else left unprotected. Unless removed, these acids will eat deeper and deeper, permanently destroying the painted finish.
Birds who invade warehouses, loading docks and storage areas can chew into packaged food products and contaminate them. Bird control can save retailers millions of dollars in waste.
Share

How to Clean up Pest Bird Droppings

Friday, August 14th, 2009

How to Clean Up Pest Bird Droppings!

Each year pest birds such as pigeons, seagulls and crows cause thousands in damage and clean up costs to building owners, homeowners and government agencies.  Pest bird droppings can carry over 60 transmittable diseases.  Several of these diseases have been known to be transmitted to humans and other animals.  Even though these diseases pose minor public health threats, they can be further minimized if safety measures are taken. Wearing protective clothing like disposable coveralls, boots, gloves, and respirators should be used for protection.

If a high-powered water hose is used to strip off dried bird droppings, dust control measures such as containing the area with plastic sheeting, should be taken. Wetting down the work area will prevent inhalation, reduce the risk of infection and will also prevent the spread of dust outside the work area. Those with a compromised immune system such as people living with HIV/AIDS or cancer patients should not be directly involved in the removal of the droppings. Always wash hands and any exposed skin before eating or drinking and when finished with work.

Several alternatives to using a high-powered water hose exist. One such alternative includes soaking the droppings with water and then shoveling it into a disposable container.   Workers should never clean DRY bird droppings from surfaces as the dust might be inhaled and transmit disease to the worker. The wet material should be collected in heavy-duty plastic bags or another type of secure container and discarded with the regular trash.

Once the structures are cleaned they may also be disinfected.  You can use a simple solution of ammonia or bleach and water and apply to the surface to disinfect and remove the odor associated with pest bird droppings.

The key to reducing the risk of disease from bird droppings is to create an environment that excludes them from affected areas:

1)     Eliminate Food Sources

  1. Clean up trash bins and garbage areas
  2. Discourage people from feeding birds
  3. Pick up trash and food scraps in outdoor eating areas

2)     Eliminate Nesting / Roosting Areas

  1. Use some sort of physical deterrent to keep birds from landing and roosting on flat surfaces; sound deterrents to scare pest birds from outdoor areas or visual deterrents to keep them out of gardens and vineyards.

3)     Call For Help!

  1. Contact a local pest control or animal control company and have them install a bird control system.

It is important to keep buildings and other areas that people inhabit free of pest birds and their debris.  Installing a bird control system will save time and money spent on clean up of bird droppings and damage made by the birds.

Share
Get Adobe Flash player

Warning: Unknown: open(/home/content/78/4549178/tmp/sess_rbe6pdg8eh3im8i77h41jvio67, O_RDWR) failed: No such file or directory (2) in Unknown on line 0

Warning: Unknown: Failed to write session data (files). Please verify that the current setting of session.save_path is correct () in Unknown on line 0