Posts Tagged ‘capture netting’

New High Powered Net Launcher Available from Bird-B-Gone

Thursday, June 14th, 2012

Mission Viejo, CA – Bird-B-Gone, Inc. leading manufacturer of professional grade bird deterrents is now offering a high powered capture net launcher.

The Super Talon Ultra is a heavy duty hand held net launcher used to capture birds for later release.

The net launcher is powered with CO² cartridges and shoots out up to 60 feet. The Super Talon Ultra can be re-used over and over and comes complete with all the necessary components for use including 10 CO² cartridges, firing handle, two launchers and a lockable foam-lined aluminum case.

The Super Talon Ultra net comes in a 2” mesh and is lightweight, easy to use, and effective for both birds and wildlife. Bird-B-Gone also offers replacement nets and nets of varying mesh sizes for larger animal captures. Currently being used exclusively by the USDA, US Fish & Wildlife and APHIS, capturing birds at long ranges has never been easier. The Super Talon Ultra is made in the USA and is a great tool for bird control and wildlife specialists to have on hand.

Bird-B-Gone is dedicated to providing customers with the latest advancements in the bird control industry. Our goal is to provide the most effective, humane, and economic products available.

To learn more, visit us online at http://www.birdbgone.com, call us at 1-800-392-6915 or email nobirds@birdbgone.com with additional questions.

 

Share

New study from UC Berkley shows Bird Mist Netting as safe and humane

Tuesday, June 28th, 2011

From Birdwatch.co.uk:

Mist netting from Bird-B-Gone, Inc.

Mist netting shown to be safe

Posted on: 28 Jun 2011

The first large scale study into bird netting, has shown the risks of injury to be minimal.

 

Capturing birds using mist nets to study behaviour, movement or the demographics of a species is one of the most common research techniques in ornithology, yet until now there have been no large scale studies into the risks mist nets pose to birds.

 

Researchers, led by Erica Spotswood from the University of California at Berkeley, used a dataset of over 345,000 records to evaluate the risks of mist netting. Data was obtained from organisations across the United States and Canada to assess the risk factors which could increase rates of injury or mortality including bird size, age, frequency of capture and the role of predators.

 

The results revealed that birds are rarely injured or killed by mist nets. Of 620,997 captures the percentage of incidents of injury amounting to 0.59 per cent while only 0.23 per cent of captures resulted in mortality. The authors then began to analyse risk factors which could lead to increased incidents.

(more…)

Share
Get Adobe Flash player