Warning: session_start() [function.session-start]: open(/home/content/78/4549178/tmp/sess_9h4amp9d8lgdqhilbonj1hb2u0, O_RDWR) failed: No such file or directory (2) in /home/content/78/4549178/html/wp-content/plugins/session-manager/includes/sm_functions.include.php on line 510

Warning: session_start() [function.session-start]: Cannot send session cookie - headers already sent by (output started at /home/content/78/4549178/html/wp-content/plugins/session-manager/includes/sm_functions.include.php:510) in /home/content/78/4549178/html/wp-content/plugins/session-manager/includes/sm_functions.include.php on line 510

Warning: session_start() [function.session-start]: Cannot send session cache limiter - headers already sent (output started at /home/content/78/4549178/html/wp-content/plugins/session-manager/includes/sm_functions.include.php:510) in /home/content/78/4549178/html/wp-content/plugins/session-manager/includes/sm_functions.include.php on line 510
Bird Strikes | Bird•B•Gone Blog

Posts Tagged ‘bird strikes’

Tragic Plane Crash Blamed on Bird Strike

Wednesday, October 3rd, 2012

Bird strikes at airports are not uncommon and can end in tragedy. The Telegraph recently reported a plane crash in Napal that took the lives of 19 people when a vulture flew into one of the engines as the plane was taking off. Tragedies like these underscore the importance of effective bird control.

Civil Aviation Authority officials noted that the pilot was forced to make an emergency landing after the plane’s front engine had been hit by a bird and ceased to function. After trying to start a second engine, the damaged engine burst into flames. When the pilot attempted to land in the nearby Monahara River (to snuff out the flames), the plane crashed into a soccer fi eld on the riverbank and was engulfed in thick, black flames. The plane crashed just 500 meters from the airport. Luckily no one was on the ground in the plane’s path. It took firefighters over 40 minutes to extinguish the flames.

It was later determined that the bird was not sucked into the engine, but hit the right side propeller. A local engineer noted that 90 percent of bird strikes occur during ta keoff. Bird collisions can result in aircraft damage, especially if the bird is large and is ingested into a jet engine. In this case, a bird will damage a fan blade in the engine, which causes adjacent blades to displace and impact all the blades in the engine. Without effective bird control measures, airports are literally at the mercy of pest birds. 

Keeping Aircraft Hangars Bird Free With Bird Netting

Since most aircraft hangars are wide open during operating hours, birds can easily flock around door openings, overhangs, eaves, canopies, support beams and other lofty areas. Birds attracted to hangars include European starlings, house sparrows and pigeons. Once they begin to nest inside, their droppings and nesting materials can easily fall onto aircraft engines, maintenance  and testing areas, and parts storage bays. Parts contaminated with bird debris can fail during testing and even cause mishaps during flight. Workers can also slip and fall on bird droppings.

One popular bird deterrent currently used to keep birds out of aircraft hangars is Heavy Duty Bird Netting.  Correctly installed by Authorized Bird Control Installers, bird netting effectively prevents birds from accessing sensitive areas.  Heavy duty bird netting comes in a variety of mesh sizes. To block out pigeons or seagulls, consider using 1-1/8- to 2-inch mesh size netting. To seal out smaller birds like sparrows, a 3/4-inch mesh netting is recommended.

Bird control experts will tell you that it’s important to specify high quality netting. The best heavy duty netting is made of high-strength polyethylene. One manufacturer offers netting that has a burst strength of up to 40 pounds. It meets ISO 1806 and 9001 protocols, is UV stabilized, flame resistant and rot- and water-proof. The best netting will have a 250-degree Fahrenheit melting point and will also remain intact in “sub-zero” temperatures. This netting is black, comes with a 10-year guarantee and is virtually invisible when properly installed.

Installing heavy duty netting in aircraft hangars should be done properly by Authorized Bird Control Installers. Such installations typically require thousands of square feet of netting. For example, to properly install the netting horizontally across an entire hangar ceiling, special boom lifts and power gear are required. Improperly installed netting can droop and sag, allowing birds to enter through spaces.

Heavy Duty Pond Netting for Wetland Areas

Properly installed, Heavy Duty Pond Netting creates a physical barrier that prevents migratory birds from landing in ponds or other water areas around aviation facilities. The netting is made from a durable, UV-stabilized Dupont® knotted mesh nylon and designed for prolonged use in harsh environments. The netting comes in large stock sizes and custom cuts. Mesh sizes vary from 3/4” to 4” to exclude a variety of large and medium sized migrating birds.

Avian Control™ Bird Repellent

Ideal for repelling birds from large expansive areas like airports, Avian Control™ Bird Repellent is a non-toxic solution that discourages geese, gulls ducks starlings and other birds from gathering and grazing.  Avian Control’s unique patent pending formula irritates the mucous membranes of birds, yet it’s harmless to birds, pets and people (all ingredients are considered “Generally Regarded As Safe” by the FDA). It lasts up to three times longer than other goose deterrents. The repellent can be sprayed and is highly economical when fogged (fogging uses just 12 to 16 ounces per acre). Avian Control™ should be applied by a licensed pest control operator.

For additional advice on how to prevent bird strikes at your airport, consult an expert like the folks at Bird-B-Gone.

Share

Chennai airport to hire agency to study spike in late night bird-hits

Monday, December 12th, 2011

From: The Times of India

Written By: V Ayyappan, TNN | Dec 5, 2011, 04.55AM IST

CHENNAI: The Airports Authority of India will hire a wildlife agency to study the spike in bird-hits at night in Chennai airport and suggest remedies.

“Pilots have been reporting bird-hits at night while approaching the airport. This is the first time we have heard about night-time bird-hits in Chennai. So, we have decided to conduct a study by engaging an ornithologist,” said airport director E P Hareendranathan.

The works to extend secondary runway across the Adyar river may have disturbed the habitat of birds, suspect AAI officials. An Indian Air Force study has also said that birds living near water bodies have been posing risk to its flights.

Share

1986 Department of Defense Video on Airfield Bird Control

Thursday, November 17th, 2011

FRIGHTENING TECHNIQUES FOR AIRFIELD BIRD CONTROL

 

Great video made by the Department of Defense in 1986 entitled Frightening Techniques for Airfield Bird Control“. The video is narrated by Leonard Nimoy and compares different methods commonly used or suggested to control birds near airfields, as their proximity poses a risk for bird-plane strikes. The varying degrees of success of  the different bird deterrents available at the time are discussed including information on Ultrasonic and Sonic Bird control units. It’s likely that this was distributed to military bases to educate the pest control and maintenance departments on how to rid their fields of birds.

 

Share

Pigeon strike forces emergency landing at TIA

Monday, November 15th, 2010
Written by: Adam Freeman 

TAMPA, FLORIDA– A plane taking off from Tampa International Airport was forced to make an emergency landing this week only minutes into the flight after hitting several birds.

It’s the same thing that forced a U.S. Airways jet to land in the Hudson River last year.

This plane, a Cayman Airways jet, only made it about 1,600 feet into the air before the pilot declared the emergency and managed to land safely, only 10 minutes after departure.

Officials say a flock of pigeons got into the right engine, forcing the pilot to shut if off.

“Actually, it’s very unusual for pigeons. Typically, we don’t have too many pigeon strikes,” said Robert Burr, the airport’s director of operations.

But hitting birds during take off or landing isn’t all that unusual, according to the F.A.A.

Read the complete article here

Share

Goose Control at Airports

Tuesday, July 7th, 2009

by Fran Prisco

GooseFlock_001Controlling pest geese at airports has become quite a topic in the news today.  On January 15, 2009 US Airways flight 1549 ended up in the Hudson River after losing both of its engines to bird strikes.  On its initial climb out of LaGuardia Airport, the plane flew through a flock of Canada Geese, which resulted in a complete loss of thrust from both engines.  Although it is unusual for a plane to lose both engines to bird strikes, The FAA says that in 2008 there where almost 7,000 reported incidents of bird strikes with planes, and that’s only a quarter of the actual ones that are happening each day.

For obvious reasons most wide-open grassy areas surround airports, which make perfect places for pest birds such as Canada Geese to make their homes.  These areas are usually fenced in and off limits to the public, so the geese have found a nice home where they are virtually undisturbed.  There is plenty of grass to graze on and often a water source as well. Having a growing population of geese residing just a few miles off the departure end of a runway is a big concern for any air traffic control manager. Most airports try to chase the birds with sounds such as cannons and banging or screeching shells which birds can become accustomed to.  They spend countless hours chasing the birds with these devices and yet the geese keep coming back.  So how can airports rid the surrounding areas of pest geese more effectively?

(more…)

Share
Get Adobe Flash player

Warning: Unknown: open(/home/content/78/4549178/tmp/sess_9h4amp9d8lgdqhilbonj1hb2u0, O_RDWR) failed: No such file or directory (2) in Unknown on line 0

Warning: Unknown: Failed to write session data (files). Please verify that the current setting of session.save_path is correct () in Unknown on line 0