Posts Tagged ‘bird strike’

Tragic Plane Crash Blamed on Bird Strike

Wednesday, October 3rd, 2012

Bird strikes at airports are not uncommon and can end in tragedy. The Telegraph recently reported a plane crash in Napal that took the lives of 19 people when a vulture flew into one of the engines as the plane was taking off. Tragedies like these underscore the importance of effective bird control.

Civil Aviation Authority officials noted that the pilot was forced to make an emergency landing after the plane’s front engine had been hit by a bird and ceased to function. After trying to start a second engine, the damaged engine burst into flames. When the pilot attempted to land in the nearby Monahara River (to snuff out the flames), the plane crashed into a soccer fi eld on the riverbank and was engulfed in thick, black flames. The plane crashed just 500 meters from the airport. Luckily no one was on the ground in the plane’s path. It took firefighters over 40 minutes to extinguish the flames.

It was later determined that the bird was not sucked into the engine, but hit the right side propeller. A local engineer noted that 90 percent of bird strikes occur during ta keoff. Bird collisions can result in aircraft damage, especially if the bird is large and is ingested into a jet engine. In this case, a bird will damage a fan blade in the engine, which causes adjacent blades to displace and impact all the blades in the engine. Without effective bird control measures, airports are literally at the mercy of pest birds. 

Keeping Aircraft Hangars Bird Free With Bird Netting

Since most aircraft hangars are wide open during operating hours, birds can easily flock around door openings, overhangs, eaves, canopies, support beams and other lofty areas. Birds attracted to hangars include European starlings, house sparrows and pigeons. Once they begin to nest inside, their droppings and nesting materials can easily fall onto aircraft engines, maintenance  and testing areas, and parts storage bays. Parts contaminated with bird debris can fail during testing and even cause mishaps during flight. Workers can also slip and fall on bird droppings.

One popular bird deterrent currently used to keep birds out of aircraft hangars is Heavy Duty Bird Netting.  Correctly installed by Authorized Bird Control Installers, bird netting effectively prevents birds from accessing sensitive areas.  Heavy duty bird netting comes in a variety of mesh sizes. To block out pigeons or seagulls, consider using 1-1/8- to 2-inch mesh size netting. To seal out smaller birds like sparrows, a 3/4-inch mesh netting is recommended.

Bird control experts will tell you that it’s important to specify high quality netting. The best heavy duty netting is made of high-strength polyethylene. One manufacturer offers netting that has a burst strength of up to 40 pounds. It meets ISO 1806 and 9001 protocols, is UV stabilized, flame resistant and rot- and water-proof. The best netting will have a 250-degree Fahrenheit melting point and will also remain intact in “sub-zero” temperatures. This netting is black, comes with a 10-year guarantee and is virtually invisible when properly installed.

Installing heavy duty netting in aircraft hangars should be done properly by Authorized Bird Control Installers. Such installations typically require thousands of square feet of netting. For example, to properly install the netting horizontally across an entire hangar ceiling, special boom lifts and power gear are required. Improperly installed netting can droop and sag, allowing birds to enter through spaces.

Heavy Duty Pond Netting for Wetland Areas

Properly installed, Heavy Duty Pond Netting creates a physical barrier that prevents migratory birds from landing in ponds or other water areas around aviation facilities. The netting is made from a durable, UV-stabilized Dupont® knotted mesh nylon and designed for prolonged use in harsh environments. The netting comes in large stock sizes and custom cuts. Mesh sizes vary from 3/4” to 4” to exclude a variety of large and medium sized migrating birds.

Avian Control™ Bird Repellent

Ideal for repelling birds from large expansive areas like airports, Avian Control™ Bird Repellent is a non-toxic solution that discourages geese, gulls ducks starlings and other birds from gathering and grazing.  Avian Control’s unique patent pending formula irritates the mucous membranes of birds, yet it’s harmless to birds, pets and people (all ingredients are considered “Generally Regarded As Safe” by the FDA). It lasts up to three times longer than other goose deterrents. The repellent can be sprayed and is highly economical when fogged (fogging uses just 12 to 16 ounces per acre). Avian Control™ should be applied by a licensed pest control operator.

For additional advice on how to prevent bird strikes at your airport, consult an expert like the folks at Bird-B-Gone.

Share

Bird Strike Against Power Line Sparks 7 Acre Fire

Monday, June 11th, 2012

Article & Video Shared From: Fox40.com

Kai Beech and Cecilio Padilla FOX40 News
6:38 p.m. PDT, June 10, 2012

RIO VISTA—

With the Red Flag Warning still in effect for most of the valley, officials have been warning the public about how quickly a fire can start.

In a field near Rio Vista Sunday afternoon, all it took was a bird strike against a power line to spark a fire. With wind still being a factor, the fire was able to quickly spread 7 acres. (more…)

Share

Bird strike causes upvalley power surge

Friday, April 27th, 2012

Bird strike causes upvalley power surge

Article Shared From: The Weekly Calistogan / The Napa Valley Register

Written By: Sean Scully | Posted: Thursday, April 26, 2012 2:15 pm

A juvenile eagle flew into high-voltage power lines in the Palisades east of Calistoga on Wednesday, knocking out power briefly over a broad area of the Upvalley and knocking out Calistoga’s main emergency dispatch repeater.

Calistoga Fire Chief Steve Campbell said the eagle hit the lines shortly after noon, causing a power surge throughout the service area. It knocked down at least some power lines in St. Helena, he said.

A spokesman for PG&E did not return a phone call seeking details of the scope of the outage.

The only major damage appears to have been to the police dispatch radio, which is mounted on Calistoga’s fire house, Campbell said. (more…)

Share

Biden plane suffers bird strike

Monday, April 23rd, 2012

AFP  AFP – Fri, Apr 20, 2012

US Vice President Joe Biden’s Air Force Two plane suffered a bird strike as it came into land in California on Thursday night and had to be grounded, a US official said.

The plane, a Boeing C-32 modeled on the 757, in blue and white air force livery, was hit by birds as it came into land in Santa Barbara, California, after a flight from Los Angeles where Biden attended a campaign event.

The pilot brought the aircraft onto the runway safely but the plane was not fit to bring the vice president back to Washington on Friday so an alternative aircraft was used, the official said.

Local news crews showed pictures of one of Air Force Two’s engines being worked on at the airport in Santa Barbara.

Biden’s plane was involved in another mishap in August 2010, when it flipped over a small light aircraft while it was taking off from West Hampton airport in New York state.

Share

Bird strike damages plane leaving PDX

Tuesday, January 3rd, 2012

Shared From: KGW.com

Photo Credit: Port of Portland

Written by:  Justin Burton

PORTLAND — A Southwest Airlines plane struck a bird upon departure from Portland International Airport Saturday afternoon, becoming the first time this year that a bird has damaged an aircraft at PDX.

Flight 3702 was departing for Oakland just before 12:30 p.m. when it hit the bird.  The captain turned around as a precaution and taxied to the gate without being towed.  None of the 136 passengers was injured, but the bird strike damaged the engine and possibly part of a wing.

According to PDX’s website, the flight was rescheduled to depart at 6 p.m.  Some passengers made other connections but nearly 100 of them will continue on to Oakland.

Southwest Airlines said the pilot made the right decision to turn the plane around. (more…)

Share

Airport brass worry compost will attract dreaded birds

Monday, December 5th, 2011

From CTV Montreal:

Updated: Fri Dec. 02 2011 5:44:41 PM
ctvmontreal.ca

MONTREAL — A proposed composting site near the airport could make takeoffs and landings less safe, contend airport officials.

The Dorval composting site is to be located one-and-a-half kilometers from the airport and the facility could attract the very birds that Trudeau Airport officials go to great lengths to deter.

“We have a falconry team at the airport and they have about three hawks, five people and a lot of tools to scare the birds away from the airport,” said Christine Beaulieu of Aeroports de Montreal.

The airport officials point out that birds can conceivably cause a plane to go down, as one flight hit the drink in the Hudson River due to an errant avian.

One bird expert says that with some preventive measures, birds will not wing near the composting site.

David Bird recommends, “fast roll-up doors, enclosed trucks, allowing none of the compost material to be outside the building in any way shape or form and even putting up deterrents for birds not to be able to perch near the facility,” said Bird, Professor of Wildlife Biology.

However the City of Montreal insists that the compost facility poses no risk.”We’ve done our homework, we know exactly how the facility will operate and we’ve done a lot of research to make sure that any risk, no matter how small, can be minimized,” said Executive Committee member Alan de Sousa.

Original Post

Share

Globally, airlines loose $1.2B due to bird strikes

Monday, June 20th, 2011

From THE NATION:

Global airlines lose $1.2b to bird strike

By Kelvin Osa- Okunbor

Stakeholders in the global aviation industry yesterday took stock of the debilitating effects of bird strikes to aircraft engines and operations, estimating the loss at $1.2 billion.

They spoke at an international workshop on aviation hazard management in Africa, organised by the Nigeria Civil Aviation Authority (NCAA), in collaboration with the United States Federal Aviation Administration and Embry Riddle Aeronautical University.

Permanent Secretary, Ministry of Aviation Ms Anne Ene Ita said the frequency of bird strikes in West Africa was worrisome.

She said in the global context of air transport, bird strike was not only dominant but also remains a natural and universal phenomenon.

(more…)

Share

Pigeons Cause Emergency Landing of Police Chopper

Wednesday, November 24th, 2010

From ktla.com

Bird Crashes Through Police Chopper Canopy, Injures Pilot

Pilot taken to hospital with minor injuries.An El Monte police helicopter was forced to make an emergency landing.

KTLA News7:40 a.m. PST, November 24, 2010

BALDWIN PARK ( KTLA) — A law enforcement helicopter was forced to make an emergency landing Tuesday evening after a pigeon flew through the aircraft’s canopy and hit the pilot in the face.

The El Monte Police Robinson two-seat helicopter was flying near Baldwin Park with the pilot and a passenger when it encountered a flock of pigeons.

One bird flew into the chopper’s canopy and struck the pilot in the face.

The injured pilot kept control of the helicopter, declared an emergency and managed to land in the field of Holland Junior High School in Baldwin Park.

Paramedics treated the pilot at the scene and took him to a local hospital with minor injuries. The name of the pilot is being withheld.

The passenger was uninjured.

El Monte Police operate 3 Robinson helicopters. El Monte’s helicopters patrol West Covina, Azusa, Irwindale, Baldwin Park, Montebello, and the Baldwin Park School District.

Read the original post here

Share
Get Adobe Flash player