Posts Tagged ‘bird sound deterrent’

Birds Do Not Hear Ultrasonic Sounds

Friday, May 18th, 2012

Ultrasonic Bird Control? Don’t Throw Your Money Away! 

Written By: Rob Fergus, Ph.D.

Sometimes hardware or lawn & garden companies advertise ultrasonic devices that are supposed to drive birds away with high frequency noises undetectable to humans.  Sounds like a good idea, right?  Blast out sounds birds can hear but we can’t—what’s not to like?  Unfortunately, the truth is that birds do not actually hear these ultrasonic sounds any better than humans do, and there is no scientific evidence that these devices actually work. The bottom line is that birds cannot hear ultrasonic frequencies and ultrasonic devices don’t work.

Humans hear sounds between the frequencies of about 20 to 20,000 acoustical vibrations per second (hertz or Hz).  Middle C is about 262 Hz and the highest piano key (C8) is about 4186 Hz.   As you get older, you lose the higher frequency sounds; middle-aged people can often hear sounds only up to 12,000-14,000 Hz (12-14kHz).  High frequency dog whistles work because dogs can hear sounds up to 40-60 kHz.  Bats use sounds up to 100 kHz to help them locate their flying insect prey and avoid obstacles in the night sky.  (more…)

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Airport brass worry compost will attract dreaded birds

Monday, December 5th, 2011

From CTV Montreal:

Updated: Fri Dec. 02 2011 5:44:41 PM
ctvmontreal.ca

MONTREAL — A proposed composting site near the airport could make takeoffs and landings less safe, contend airport officials.

The Dorval composting site is to be located one-and-a-half kilometers from the airport and the facility could attract the very birds that Trudeau Airport officials go to great lengths to deter.

“We have a falconry team at the airport and they have about three hawks, five people and a lot of tools to scare the birds away from the airport,” said Christine Beaulieu of Aeroports de Montreal.

The airport officials point out that birds can conceivably cause a plane to go down, as one flight hit the drink in the Hudson River due to an errant avian.

One bird expert says that with some preventive measures, birds will not wing near the composting site.

David Bird recommends, “fast roll-up doors, enclosed trucks, allowing none of the compost material to be outside the building in any way shape or form and even putting up deterrents for birds not to be able to perch near the facility,” said Bird, Professor of Wildlife Biology.

However the City of Montreal insists that the compost facility poses no risk.”We’ve done our homework, we know exactly how the facility will operate and we’ve done a lot of research to make sure that any risk, no matter how small, can be minimized,” said Executive Committee member Alan de Sousa.

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Why Bird-B-Gone?

Tuesday, April 5th, 2011

Bird-B-Gone, Inc.  -The Leader in Effective, Humane Bird Control Products.

Our people, products expertise and training make the difference.

Why choose Bird-B-Gone as your Bird Control provider?

Bird-B-Gone, Inc. is the worlds largest manufacturer of professional grade bird deterrents. Since 1992m our products have helped to solve pest bird problems in commercial, industrial and residential settings across the globe. Our superior products, excellent customer service, extensive product knowledge and innovation have helped to secure our position as the number one manufacturer and supplier of bird deterrents.

We pride ourselves on the personal relationships we build with our customers. At Bird-B-Gone, we measure our success by the success we create for our customers!

Bird-B-Gone is the only bird control manufacturer who can back up their products and guarantees with predictable success.

The Bird-B-Gone Difference:

  • Bird-B-Gone Products are humane, effective and carry industry leading guarantees.
  • We manufacture a majority of our own products at our facility in the U.S.  ensuring the highest quality products at the lowest prices!
  • Our bird control engineers have a combined 80+ years of hands on experience. They are there to give professional advice on product installation.
  • We are the only Bird Control company with an on staff Ornithologist to help teach and advise our customers
  • We offer free training and support for all aspects of bird control including on site training and technical support
  • We regularly host a free training course – Bird-B-Gone university, that teaches everything from quoting a bird job to product installation
  • We offer same day and express shipping, even on custom netting
  • Our products are available worldwide through a network of quality distributors
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McDonald’s battles birds with noise

Friday, February 18th, 2011

From the Las Cruces Sun News:

By Diana M. Alba DALBA@LCSUN-NEWS.COM

LAS CRUCES – If you’ve ever stopped at the McDonald’s on El Paseo Road, or just strolled by on the sidewalk, you may have noticed a raucous screeching.It sounds – at first listen – as if a flock of noisy birds must be somewhere nearby, perhaps roosting on the rooftop. But the exact source of the shrill squawking seems a mystery.

“You hear the noise and you look up and say: ‘There’s no birds,’” said Michelle Mendez, 24, of Anthony, N.M., who visited the McDonald’s on El Paseo Road on Tuesday.The screeching has been heard, at times, on the McDonald’s on North Main Street, as well.

If your curiosity has ever been piqued, wonder no more.The mysterious, intermittent noise isn’t real birds. Rather, it’s an audio recording of birds in distress, meant for scaring away pesky fowl such as pigeons, said Keel Price, wildlife biologist and district supervisor for the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Wildlife Services branch. The agency carries out various types of pest control.

“Sometimes non-lethal deterrents work,” he said. “It’s probably effective.”

The idea is that the sound of a bird in crisis will seem like a threat, Price said. But he pointed out that the ploy only works for so long before birds become accustomed to it. If the recording plays continuously, he said, the birds more quickly realize that they’re not in danger and become acclimated.

“Even thesmallest-brained of birds can only expend so much energy fleeing false threats,” he said.

To make the devices more effective, it helps to lengthen the amount of the pause between rounds of screeching, Price said. And even better, he said, is to rotate the audio with other non-lethal deterrents, such as “scary-eyed” balloons, fake great horned owls and rubber snakes.

“If people will change them out, they work much longer,” he said. “They need to change these up and rotate them.”

Mike Lavin, the owner of most of the Las Cruces McDonald’s restaurants, couldn’t be reached for comment.

Frank Fiore, district manager for the state Environment Department, which does restaurant inspections, said there’s no regulation against birds on eatery rooftops. But their presence could cause problems if a facility ever had a leak in the roof that carried bird droppings into a kitchen. A roof leak at a Georgia peanut butter processing facility was behind in a massive recall in recent years, he said.

“If there are openings in the ceiling, it’s in the category of violations we’d label as low-risk, but it could actually turn into high-risk, if we had rain water with pigeon feces in it running into a place where food is being prepared.”

Fiore said he didn’t recall any restaurants – whether McDonald’s or not – where that’s been a problem.

Price said air conditioning units on rooftops tend to attract birds, in the summer especially, because they provide shade and water at the same time. Wrapping poultry wire around the base, to keep birds from getting underneath, is a good way to prevent that, he said.

Mendez and her mother said they’d noticed the screeching noises previously when visiting the laundromat across the street from the El Paseo McDonald’s but didn’t realize what it was. After learning it was a bird deterrent, they said they thought it was a good idea, especially at a restaurant setting.

“It’s pretty smart,” Mendez said. “You help keep pigeons away and you keep the disease away.”Audio recordings often are used to scare blackbirds, seagulls and sometimes Canada geese, Price said.

Diana M. Alba can be reached at (575) 541-5443.

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Syncrude found guilty in duck deaths

Monday, June 28th, 2010

Canadian company Syncrude Canada LTD. has been on trial recently over the death of 1,600 migratory ducks at a treatment pond in 2008, today, the judge ruled they were indeed responsible for the deaths, charging that the company had failed to implement plans to protect wildlife. From Reuters:

ST. ALBERT, Alberta, June 25 (Reuters) – A judge found Syncrude Canada Ltd, Canada’s largest oil sands producer, guilty on Friday in the deaths of 1,600 ducks that landed on a toxic Northern Alberta tailings pond in 2008, ruling the company should have had deterrents in place.

Syncrude faces maximum penalties of C$500,000 for provincial charges and C$300,000 under federal charges in the case, which crystallized international concern about the environmental impact of developing Canada’s vast oil sands, the largest crude oil source outside the Middle East.

Alberta Provincial Court Judge Ken Tjosvold ruled the company failed to take necessary steps to keep the waterfowl away from the tailings pond at its Aurora mine in April 2008.

Read the Complete article here

Bird-B-Gone products not only help protect homes and businesses from birds, but can also protect birds themselves. Bird deterrents can be used to prevent birds from entering harmful areas or such as processing plants, or deter them from getting stuck in areas such as attics or rafters. Sound deterrents can be used to keep birds from large outdoor areas. To learn more visit our website http://www.birdbgone.com

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