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Bird Off | Bird•B•Gone Blog

Posts Tagged ‘bird off’

Need to Keep Birds Out of Rafters? Bird Netting to the Rescue

Thursday, June 6th, 2013

keep birds off with bird nettingBirds love to sit and nest in high places that protect them from predators and weather. This means that places with open ceilings with beams and rafters, like warehouses or manufacturing facilities, are perfect for birds in search of a nesting area.

Birds will sit on beams, pooping and preening, which causes a huge mess but the acidic droppings can erode building materials. Bird droppings also carry up to 60 transmittable diseases and when dried can blow around in dust form and be inhaled by humans. Nesting also creates a mess and a hazard. Workers who have to climb in the rafters, to change lights for example, are at risk of being injured or picking up diseases. Additionally, droppings fall on equipment and product or anything produced in the open area facility, potentially damaging or ruining the expensive equipment and product.

This is a serious problem that must be addressed. The best way to keep birds out is to create a barrier that fully excludes birds from being able to enter the area altogether. Bird Netting is the perfect solution for getting rid of birds in your rafters. The best, most efficient and effective bird netting is the Bird Net 2000™, which provides 100% bird exclusion and is the #1 bird net specified by architects and government agencies. Depending on the size of your affected area, there are multiple options for bird netting

Bird netting requires professional installation and installation hardware. If you do not have an installer, we can connect you with authorized installers in your area to ensure your bird netting is properly installed and your bird problems are solved.

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Oil company fined $22,500 over dead birds

Thursday, December 20th, 2012

BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) – A Denver-based oil company has pleaded guilty to violating federal law in the deaths of migratory birds in fluid pits at the company’s oil and gas drilling facilities in Montana, Wyoming and Nebraska and has been fined $22,500.

The U.S. Attorney’s Office in Montana said SM Energy Co. pleaded guilty Wednesday one misdemeanor count of violating the Migratory Bird Treaty Act in each state. U.S. Magistrate Carolyn Ostby also placed the company on probation for a year and ordered it to make a $7,500 payment to the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation.

The case dates back to 2005, when the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service documented deaths of a dozen migratory birds at uncovered open fluid pits at Nance Petroleum sites in Wyoming. Nance later become an SM Energy subsidiary.

Copyright 2012 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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Bird Flu Controlled in Mexico

Wednesday, December 19th, 2012

by Xinhua News Agency

Image credit: US EPA

Mexican President Felipe Calderon on Wednesday announced that the bird flu having broken out four months ago in the western Jalisco state has been “totally controlled.”

“After 68 days with no new cases reported, we are entering the stage of eradication” of the H7N3 virus, Calderon said at the presidential residence.

Mexico will recover very soon from the highly dangerous avian influenza, he said, stressing that the control of this disease is the result of “great effort of the government and producers.”

Among the measures, he said the culling of over 22 million chickens, the establishment of a sanitary cordon and the development of an “effective vaccine against the disease, are crucial to control the virus quickly and decisively.”

In the past months, “around 140 million doses of vaccine have been applied, and we also have a sufficient reserve bank to use if necessary,” the president said.

Thanks to efforts to restore the productive capacity of the farming, Mexico is expected to recover in November the number of laying hens to the level prior to the outbreak of the avian influenza, he said.

Calderon noted that the goal now is to stimulate the creation of new chicken producers’ centers in other parts of Mexico to diversify regional egg production and prevent such an impact in the future. However, Jaime Crivelli, president of the National Poultry Union, criticized the government for minimizing the impact of the bird flu on egg production.

As a response, Calderon said his government acted in time, because otherwise the damage to egg production would have been irreversible in his country, the fifth largest producer in the world and the largest per capita egg consumer.

He announced a support of $16.6 million (215 million pesos)in normalizing egg production and credits for those who want to engage in egg production.

The president noted that so far 65 percent of egg production has been restored. Besides, the country has imported nearly 14,000 tons of eggs, mainly from the United States, to meet demand.

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Battle to Protect Norwich’s Historic Buildings From Pigeons Widens

Tuesday, December 18th, 2012

by Richard Wheeler (via Norwich Evening News 24)

The battle to protect Norwich’s historic buildings from feathered invaders has intensified – as officials attempt to defend two more city attractions from their droppings.

How it could look if pigeons attacked Norwich Castle. (Image credit: Norwich Evening News 24)

Proposals to install pigeon-guarding systems have been put forward for the Bridewell and Shirehall, following a successful application for a similar idea at Norwich Castle. Mess on the pavement outside the Shirehall, in Market Avenue, below where the pigeons roost, affects access to the building for visitors according to planning documents from the Norfolk museums service.

The papers add that the droppings are also causing white staining to the stonework, which cleaning is “unlikely to remove”, as well as health and safety issues. At the Bridewell, the documents state the volume of pigeon waste creates a risk of “slipping on wet foul”.

Measures to deter pigeons from sills and ledges in the museum’s central courtyard were installed during a recent £1.5m refurbishment. But the plans reveal these are ineffective in many areas.

There are concerns at both sites that the mess stops workers being able to reach and clean out gutters and pipes to stop them getting blocked. There is a risk water could seep into the walls and damage the buildings’ walls if these are not unblocked.

Posts with thin wire on them are proposed for both buildings. These aim to stop pigeons from being able to roost or perch.

Museum officials are also bidding for cash to fund a similar defence system at Norwich Castle after the city council approved the plan. It is hoped these measures will protect the 11th century structure from further damage. The post and wire system was trialled and also checked by English Heritage before permission was granted, to try and ensure it will not ruin the appearance of the castle.

Stuart Garner, operations manager for Norwich museums, said: “We’ve had the pilot and we all agreed on the best way forward with English Heritage. We’ve got the majority of listed-building consent. Now, it’s preparing the documents for the funding.”

Mr Garner said it was Norfolk County Council’s responsibility to look after the attractions, but the city council has agreed to contribute 30pc toward the costs of pigeon-proofing them. No cost figures have yet to be made public.

Dr Will Fletcher, English Heritage’s inspector of ancient monuments in Norfolk, said it is difficult trying to protect historic buildings from pigeons.

But he said it involved pinpointing the ideal roosting locations and then installing new equipment without damaging the fabric of the building while ensuring it is “sympathetic” to its appearance.

Dr Fletcher said of the Norwich Castle plans: “It can all be taken away without damaging the fabric and leaving the castle intact.

“We will come back six to eight months or a year later down the line to see how effective it’s been.

“We are aware of the fact pigeons can be a problem elsewhere. We’ve talked about the issues, falconry and other options around the town but it pushes it from one place to another.

“There will be an ongoing issue and it’s really something for the people of Norwich to get involved in and we welcome their views.”

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Globally, airlines loose $1.2B due to bird strikes

Monday, June 20th, 2011

From THE NATION:

Global airlines lose $1.2b to bird strike

By Kelvin Osa- Okunbor

Stakeholders in the global aviation industry yesterday took stock of the debilitating effects of bird strikes to aircraft engines and operations, estimating the loss at $1.2 billion.

They spoke at an international workshop on aviation hazard management in Africa, organised by the Nigeria Civil Aviation Authority (NCAA), in collaboration with the United States Federal Aviation Administration and Embry Riddle Aeronautical University.

Permanent Secretary, Ministry of Aviation Ms Anne Ene Ita said the frequency of bird strikes in West Africa was worrisome.

She said in the global context of air transport, bird strike was not only dominant but also remains a natural and universal phenomenon.

(more…)

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All About Bird Spikes…

Monday, May 9th, 2011

New Bird-B-Gone Bird Spike Video posted on Buildings.com

Link: Getting Started with Bird Spikes

Bird spikes are an effective, humane way to prevent birds from landing in unwanted areas. Bird spikes do not harm birds, they simply create an uneven surface that birds know they cannot land on. Bird Spikes can be glued or screwed down to most surfaces and are a permanent solution for preventing birds from landing.

At Bird-B-Gone, we manufacture our Bird Spikes right here at our  facility in Santa Ana California. This enables us to to ensure the highest quality bird spikes on the market. Our spikes carry industry leading guarantees and require no assembly.

Learn all about Bird Spikes including:

-Where Bird Spikes Can Be Installed

-What Type of Birds Bird Spikes are Effective for

-How to Install Bird Spikes

-How Bird Spikes Are Sold

 

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Stench at So. Cal. beach blamed on bird droppings

Tuesday, March 8th, 2011

From the OC register:

That south county stink? Try a bird-poop cocktail

TEXT BY BRITTANY LEVINE, PHOTO BY PAUL BERSEBACH

Article Tab : landfill-contracts-juan-d

The good news: The stench at a Dana Point beach is temporary.

The bad news: It may come back.

The December storms caused San Juan Creek to flood from San Juan Capistrano to Dana Point and caused ferocious 5.72 feet-per-second currents to rush through the creek. The creek water outfall at Doheny State Beach was then flushed into the ocean.

That mixture is behind the rotten egg smell near the lifeguard headquarters.

Bird poop and other organic matter that had accumulated in the creek mixed with sulfates in the ocean water, said David Pryor, an environmental scientist with the state Department of Parks and Recreation.

The combination made a stinky smell—similar to that of sulfur-rich hot springs. The smell was greatest following the storms. Then debris covered up most of the bird poop-salt water cocktail, plant materials and bacteria that had soaked into the sand. But recent beach cleanups aimed at removing debris unleashed the stench again.

“We do not consider the odor dangerous,” Pryor said in an e-mail.

Over time, the surf and tides will sort and wash away the stinky matter, he said.

Read the complete article here

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From Bird-B-Gone Inc.

Just last year, the Lompoc Record reported that it was an accumulation of pigeon droppings that had contaminated the water quality under the Pismo Beach Pier. Sure the stench may not be harmful, what about the bacteria found in bird droppings? It would take a lot of  droppings to create such a stench – if it truly is the source of the “fowl” smell, the city may want to consider the health risk associated with the droppings.  In small doses it usually doesn’t cause that big of a concern, but when found in such large quantities, health risks should be considered as bird droppings are known to carry bacteria and disease.

There are many products available to humanely deter birds from open spaces. Not sure which product is right for you? Contact our team of bird control engineers to help you choose and design the right bird deterrent system for you. Bird-B-Gone also has a network of authorized installers who can install bird control products call 1-800-392-6915 or visit http://www.birdbgone.com

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