Posts Tagged ‘bird net’

Bird-B-Gone University for Bird Control Scores High in Recent Audit

Thursday, January 16th, 2014

Bird Control Training

Bird-B-Gone Inc.’s Bird-B-Gone University was recently audited for review and approval by the California Department of Pesticide Regulation (DPR). Bird-B-Gone received excellent remarks from the DPR as a four hour Continuing Education (CE) credit in Bird Control training.

Bird-B-Gone University, a bird control training course offered by Bird-B-Gone, was recently audited by the Department of Pesticide Regulation. The course covers many things commercial bird control installers need to know. The course qualifies as a continuing education course through the DPR.  Bird-B-Gone provides this free training at their facilities in Santa Ana, CA at least every other month.

Mike Dougherty, a bird control engineer at Bird-B-Gone, was well received as the presenter of this course.  “Mr. Dougherty was very knowledgeable in the subject matter and provided useful pesticide and pest management information,” says Lisa Estridge, Environmental Scientist with the DPR. “He presented bird management from an IPM perspective and encouraged attendees to use a variety of bird control methods, such as exclusion, sanitation and mechanical tools. His presentation included a PowerPoint presentation, photographs, sample products and anecdotes that made the course more relatable to the attendees.”

Bird-B-Gone University is designed to ensure pest control operators are equipped with the necessary knowledge and tools to properly install Bird-B-Gone bird control products. “All questions from the attendees were answered quickly and accurately. In addition, the course materials and comfortable facility, along with the announcement at the beginning of the course to silence cell phones, created an environment conducive to learning. Overall, the course was informative and well received by the attendees,” says Estridge.

To learn more about becoming an Authorized Installer of Bird-B-Gone’s bird control products click here.

Share

Need to Keep Birds Out of Rafters? Bird Netting to the Rescue

Thursday, June 6th, 2013

keep birds off with bird nettingBirds love to sit and nest in high places that protect them from predators and weather. This means that places with open ceilings with beams and rafters, like warehouses or manufacturing facilities, are perfect for birds in search of a nesting area.

Birds will sit on beams, pooping and preening, which causes a huge mess but the acidic droppings can erode building materials. Bird droppings also carry up to 60 transmittable diseases and when dried can blow around in dust form and be inhaled by humans. Nesting also creates a mess and a hazard. Workers who have to climb in the rafters, to change lights for example, are at risk of being injured or picking up diseases. Additionally, droppings fall on equipment and product or anything produced in the open area facility, potentially damaging or ruining the expensive equipment and product.

This is a serious problem that must be addressed. The best way to keep birds out is to create a barrier that fully excludes birds from being able to enter the area altogether. Bird Netting is the perfect solution for getting rid of birds in your rafters. The best, most efficient and effective bird netting is the Bird Net 2000™, which provides 100% bird exclusion and is the #1 bird net specified by architects and government agencies. Depending on the size of your affected area, there are multiple options for bird netting

Bird netting requires professional installation and installation hardware. If you do not have an installer, we can connect you with authorized installers in your area to ensure your bird netting is properly installed and your bird problems are solved.

Share

Get Rid Of Seagulls

Tuesday, December 11th, 2012

Southern California Radio Host Calls for Much Needed Bird Control Action

Accumulated bird dropping have created quite the stink at La Jolla Cove, giving local San Diego residents something to complain about. Merchants say the smell from the accumulated bird droppings have been driving away business and sickening patrons. Recently, the New York Times reported on the incident, bringing the problem into the national light, generating embarrassing publicity or the scenic spot.
This problem can be easily fixed with the following bird deterrents from Bird-B-Gone:

Bird Traps: A “live” bird trap that captures pest birds for later release or relocation

Bird Chase: Super Sonic: A bird sound system that is ideal for keeping birds out of open, outdoor spaces

Bird Spikes: Spikes used to humanely prevent birds from landing on unwanted surfaces

Bird Net: A U.V. stabilized polyethylene mesh that keeps birds from entering unwanted areas, especially where people eat.

Bird Jolt Flat Track: Electric track system that produces a mild electrical shock when birds land on its surface, conditioning them to stay away from the area

Bird Spider: Made of stainless steel arms attached to a U.V. protected polycarbonate base that prevent birds from landing

The above bird problem can happen anywhere – the key is to have access to the proper bird control products to rectify the situation and ensure the birds do not return and the patrons remain happy and healthy.

Share

Pigeons cause structural damage on bridge

Tuesday, July 10th, 2012

Bridge pigeons’ days are numbered 

Article Shared From: The Otago Daily Times / NZ

Written By: Sarah Marquet

Pigeon poo is threatening the Alexandra bridge across the Clutha River, so the birds have to go.

New Zealand Transport Agency (NZTA) senior asset manager John Jarvis said the bridge’s structural steel was being corroded and, while it was not an immediate safety risk, action was needed to reduce the 400-strong flock of resident pigeons so damaged areas could be repaired.

The corrosion mostly affected the surface, but there were also some cases of pitting. (more…)

Share

Heavy Duty Pond Netting Protects Migrating Birds from Collection Ponds

Monday, March 26th, 2012

Article Written By: Alex A. Kecskes

Recent studies have shown that every year, thousands of protected migratory birds die in tailings or detention ponds used for industrial waste or filtering. Tailing ponds may contain bitumen, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, volatile organic compounds, naphthenic acids, brine, heavy metals, and ammonia—substances that are harmful, even fatal to birds.

The problem arises when birds mistake these ponds for fresh water. Without effective bird control measures to keep birds out of these ponds, the birds are doomed to suffer illness or even die. Most government agencies require companies to implement a comprehensive bird deterrent system if they plan to operate these types of ponds.

(more…)

Share

Why Bird Netting?

Monday, March 12th, 2012

Written by: Alex A. Kecskes

Let’s face it, pest birds can cost you a lot of money. Especially when they gather, nest and poop in airplane hangars, canopies, garages, factories, warehouses, eaves and other covered areas. There are many ways to humanely get rid of pest birds. One of the most effective is bird netting.

It makes sense when you have hundreds to thousands of square feet to cover. The netting can stretch over all beams, ledges pipes and other areas birds can roost or nest on. Not to mention, Bird Netting is one of the few products that can successfully solve a bird problem where birds have been nesting. When birds establish a nesting site they can be very territorial about keeping their home. Bird netting acts as a humane barrier that completely blocks birds from reentering the site.

But before getting into why bird netting works so well, we should look at why doing nothing is not a good idea. (more…)

Share

Protect Migrating Birds from Collection Ponds with Bird-B-Gone’s Heavy Duty Pond Netting

Friday, February 10th, 2012

Mission Viejo, CA – Bird-B-Gone, Inc. leading manufacturer of effective, humane bird deterrents  would like to announce a new addition to their line of professional grade bird control products, Heavy Duty Pond Netting.

Recent studies have shown that every year, thousands of protected migratory birds die in tailing or detention ponds used for industrial waste or filtering. Birds mistake these ponds for fresh water and often become poisoned by toxins present in the water.

Pond Netting is used as a physical barrier to prevent birds from landing in toxic tailing ponds or other water collection sites. The netting is stretched over these areas to prevent bird deaths. Installing pond netting will not only protect birds, but will also prevent the hefty fines associated with migratory bird deaths. (more…)

Share

Bird-B-Gone Launches Today’s Facility Manager Bird Control Channel

Tuesday, August 9th, 2011

From Today’s Facility Manager:

 

By Mary Ellen McCandless, on August 8, 2011, at 3:30 pm

Bird-B-Gone has unveiled its new Bird Control Channel on the Today’s Facility Manager website.


Founded in 1992, Bird-B-Gone’s products have helped solve pest bird problems in commercial, industrial and residential settings across the globe. Bird-B-Gone offers effective and humane solutions to prevent birds from landing and roosting in unwanted areas. Products include Bird Netting and Hardware, Bird Spikes, Electric Track Systems, Live Traps and more. Bird-B-Gone has a devoted team of bird control engineers with over 80 years of combined experience to help in all aspects of bird control including design and installation.

 

Visit Bird-B-Gone’s Bird Control Channel to learn more.

Share

How to Keep Pest Birds Out of Airplane Hangars

Thursday, August 4th, 2011

Written By: Fran Prisco

Airplane hangars have often become a natural habitat for birds.  They are wide open, offer shelter and ideal nesting areas. Clinton Air Force Base in Oklahoma had six hangars with 200-300 house sparrows in each hangar. Lockbourne Air Base in Ohio had 2,000 to 3,000 house sparrows between three hangars with an additional 2,000-3,000 starlings.  Along with these birds come the droppings and debris they leave behind.  Bird droppings, accumulating on the aluminum skin of airplanes, can corrode the metal and eventually weaken the structure itself. Another serious concern is that if droppings, feathers, and other matter get into the engines, critically important parts must be cleaned as they could stop an engine during flight. Cleaning an aircraft engine is very expensive and time consuming.

Pest bird droppings can also pose significant health risks, carrying and transmitting any of 60 known diseases. Sparrows and Feral Pigeons can carry bacteria causing Salmonellosis. Feral Pigeons carry Ornithosis, which is similar to viral pneumonia. Not only do the droppings and debris left behind by birds damage the airplanes kept in hangars, they are also dangerous to the personal working on the planes.

Problem: Pest birds are causing added maintenance to aircraft and endangering airline personal with their droppings and debris.  Thousands of dollars spent each year on cleaning aircraft skins, engines and airplane hangar infrastructures.

Solution: Install bird netting in the airplane hanger.  Bird netting is an exclusionary bird control system.  Once installed, pest birds are excluded from the area being protected by the bird net.  It is often necessary to install bird netting on the sides of the walls as well as under the roof.  The goal is to block off any areas that pest birds will find attractive to land, roost and nest.  Once installed, the bird netting is virtually invisible and will need very little maintenance.  In fact there are bird net installations inside airplane hangars that have gone untouched for well over 10 years and are still as effective as the day that they where installed.

When choosing bird netting to install in an airplane hangar or any area, be sure to get heavy-duty bird netting that has a break strength of at least 45 pounds.  This ensures that the netting will be strong enough to keep birds from defeating it.  Bird netting comes in various mesh sizes.  The ¾ inch mesh bird netting is ideal for all types of birds, the mesh is small enough so that even small birds like sparrows cannot get through.  If large birds like pigeons and gulls are the issue, choose a bird netting with a 2-inch mesh size, this can save a lot of money for large bird netting jobs.

If the bird netting installation looks to be too complicated, look for a professional bird control installer in your area that can help.   Manufacturers of bird control products can usually suggest the right person or company for the job.

___________

If you would like to learn more about Bird Netting including Bird Net installation advice and more, visit Bird-B-Gone, Inc. Bird-B-Gone sells a heavy duty professional grade bird netting meant for permanent use along with a complete line of installation hardware. Need advice on a bird net job? The experienced Bird Control Engineers at Bird-B-Gone can help! Call 1-800-392-6915 email nobirds@birdbgone.com or visit http://www.birdbgone.com

 

Share

New Bird-B-Gone Video: Getting started with Bird Netting

Tuesday, June 14th, 2011

Getting Started with Bird Netting

Bird Net 2000 is a heavy duty polyethylene knotted net used to block birds from entering unwanted areas. Our heavy duty bird netting has the longest guarantee in the industry – 10 years, is U.V. resistant and is available in various sizes and custom cuts. Bird Net 2000 is the #1 bird net specified by architects and government agencies.

Bird netting is used to exclude pest birds from areas such as rooftops, warehouses, airline hangars, overhangs, eaves and other areas.  Bird Netting will provide 100% exclusion of birds and is a long-term humane bird control solution.

This new video will teach you the general applications of Bird Netting including where it can be installed, various types of bird netting and hardware available, and more.

If you have questions about bird net installation, or on choosing the right bird net, please call our sales team at 1-800-392-6915. Our bird control engineers can help with everything from helping you quote materials, bid on a job, and provide technical installation advice.

 

Share

Refinery to pay $850,000 for bird deaths

Tuesday, June 7th, 2011

Oil refinery ordered to pay $850,000 in penalties after dozens of migratory birds died in an oil retention pond. The deaths occur when birds mistake these toxic ponds as fresh water sources . Fines for killing migratory birds are steep, and many plants are looking at effective solutions for keeping birds safe including sound and visual deterrents set u around the area to try and dissuade birds. One effective bird control solution for retention ponds is installing a heavy duty netting over the pond suspended by perimeter posts. The bird netting would act as a physical barrier, preventing birds from accessing the water altogether.

From the Billings Gazette:

Refinery will pay $850,000 penalty for violations

KEN DRIESE/Casper Star-Tribune

By JEREMY FUGLEBERG

Casper Star-Tribune‌

| Posted: Monday, June 6, 2011 11:45 pm

CASPER, Wyo. — The owner of an oil refinery near Rawlins with a raft of pollution problems in recent years has agreed to a multi-million dollar settlement with state regulators regarding a 2010 incident that killed dozens of birds.

Sinclair Wyoming Refinery Co. will pay $850,000 for releasing oil into a wastewater evaporation pond at its refinery, the Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality announced Monday.

Sinclair also agreed to spend $4.5 million on equipment upgrades and training.

On April 25, 2010, the company notified state environmental regulators that oil had been released into one of the refinery’s wastewater evaporation ponds.

After the release, 80 migratory birds were found dead in the polluted pond, a company spokesman said shortly after the incident. The final number of birds affected was far higher, state regulators say.

Read the Complete article HERE

Share

Audubon activist suggests bird netting to prevent nesting swallows

Thursday, June 2nd, 2011

From the San Luis Tribune:

By Joe Johnston | jjohnston@thetribunenews.com

Empty nest: It’s Avila Beach, not avian beach

Netting on community center should keep the birds from coming back and rebuilding

By David Sneed | dsneed@thetribunenews.com

Archie Corpuz of Archie’s Aloha Pest Management stepped forward to solve a persistent problem of cliff swallows nesting in the eaves of the Avila Beach Community Center.

On Monday, his business installed nets to discourage the birds from building their mud nests on the center.

The Avila Beach Civic Association bought the nets for about $700, and Corpuz installed them for free.

The problem began when an unusually large number of swallows began nesting on the building, and their prolific droppings caused health and safety concerns.

Stephanie Little, an activist with the Morro Coast Audubon Society, became concerned when she learned that the nests were being washed away only to have the birds come back the next day and start nest-building all over again.

Read the entire story HERE

Share

A young New Brunswick woman was blinded and nearly killed simply by coming into contact with pigeon feces…

Monday, May 23rd, 2011

From the Ottawa Citizen:

‘Please don’t feed the pigeons’

A young New Brunswick woman was blinded and nearly killed simply by coming into contact with pigeon feces. Michael Staples tells the heartbreaking tale of a life torn apart

By Michael Staples, Fredericton Daily Gleaner April 26, 2011

In just a few weeks, Erica Richards has been transformed from a vibrant 23-year-old who loved nature into a woman who’s battling for her life.

In early January, Richards contracted a potentially fatal condition called cryptococcal meningitis, a fungal disease carried in the feces of pigeons.

The debilitating illness attacks the spine and the brain, causing severe swelling. It left her confined to a hospital bed in a state of delirium for weeks.

But the most devastating consequence of the sickness is that Richards is now blind.

“Be aware of this disease. It could kill a child in a heartbeat,” Richards said from her hospital bed.

“It could kill a senior in a heartbeat without you even having to worry about the symptoms. It comes on that fast. If you don’t realize the symptoms, it could kill you, too.”

Richards’ warning comes on the heels of Fredericton city council’s approval earlier this month of a recommendation it toughen its animal-control bylaw to make it illegal to feed pigeons.

While such complaints are unusual, a problem exists on the city’s Grandame Street with a property owner who refuses to stop feeding the birds. The pigeons are roosting on roofs and defecating.

(more…)

Share

Bird Netting an Effective, Humane Bird Deterrent

Tuesday, April 26th, 2011

Article by: Alex Kecskes

There are songbirds, lovebirds and pet birds. And then there are pest birds. Birds we can all do without. Birds we don’t want to harm–we just want them to stay away. One way to do that is the subject of this article.

Bird Netting for Facilities Managers

If you’re a facilities or plant manager, you undoubtedly know that pest birds can cost you a ton of money and aggravation . They can easily invade your aircraft hangar, factory or warehouse, gathering by the hundreds in eaves, canopies and other large covered areas. Support beams make ideal landing, roosting and nesting areas for these pest birds. If you don’t keep them out with bird deterrents like bird netting, you’ll have to contend with all sorts of problems.

One of the biggest problems with pest birds is bird droppings. Aside from being unsightly and unhealthy, droppings can stop up gutters and down pipes. They can also “freeze up” ceiling windows and vents, as well as rooftop turbine ventilators and siding windows. Bird droppings can eat into corrugated metal surfaces, cover light sensors and security cameras, even block out those new solar panels you just installed to save energy. In fact, the acid in bird droppings can eat into electrical equipment to create a fire hazard. If you manage  a warehouse, bird droppings can spoil finished products in loading bays and storage areas. They can damage goods, and ruin the appearance of expensive finished goods. And something few facilities managers think about are slip-and-fall hazards created by bird droppings–this can become a costly legal liability should a worker or visitor become injured.
(more…)

Share

So Your Building Has Birds….

Wednesday, April 20th, 2011

Article featured on BuildingsMagazine.com

Written by: Meredith Walako

A step by step guide to bird exclusion for commercial buildings.

You’ve got birds. It could be gulls sitting on your roof top or maybe pigeons making a mess of signs and awnings. Perhaps you have an open loading dock and have starlings nesting in the rafters.
Whatever the situation, all you know is that birds are creating a problem that must be addressed. So where do you start?

You may be well aware of the need to implement pest control procedures for general pests such as mice and termites, but few consider the damage birds can cause to the exterior or interior of a building.

Bruce Donoho, Owner of Bird-B-Gone Inc., a U.S. manufacturer of bird control products says birds can cause considerable problems for buildings. “The build up of bird droppings and nesting materials can pose a health risk for building tenants, especially if found near ventilation systems. Bird droppings can corrode building materials and machinery, ruin stored product and cost a business thousands of dollars every year for clean-up.”

The advantages of bird control
Convincing management to include bird control measures into the budget can be easy when you present the benefits versus the cost.

First, consider if you have a maintenance crew doing any regular clean-up of bird droppings. Outside of labor costs, there is the potential of damaged goods, lost customers or tenants, damaged machinery, and health concerns.

The benefit of bird deterrents such as those offered by Bird-B-Gone is that they are often permanent solutions, different from common pests that call for regular treatments. Bird-B-Gone carries a variety of effective, humane products to fit nearly any situation.

(more…)

Share

Bird Proofing an Integral Part of Building Maintenance

Friday, April 8th, 2011

Like everything else you own or manage, buildings require regular maintenance to keep them from deteriorating. Regardless of the size of your building, certain specific tasks must be performed to ensure heating, cooling, ventilation, and air conditioning systems are operating properly and continue to meet health and safety codes. Bird proofing can prevent droppings, nests and other and other bird debris from damaging these important systems–systems that can be very costly to repair or replace.

 

Likewise, a building’s plumbing systems, drains, drinking fountains, sprinkler systems and the timers that control them must be kept free of bird droppings and other debris to function properly. The same holds true for outdoor walkways, tables and chairs used by employees. Bird proofing will keep disease-carrying droppings from contaminating these areas. They can also prevent costly litigation should someone slip and fall on bird droppings.

 

Exterior lighting and security cameras must be kept clear and fully functional to ensure the safety of visitors and employees. Bird droppings and nests can obscure and render these systems inoperative unless bird-proofing devices are installed. Similarly, exterior locks, doors and windows can jam up, leaving gaps in a building’s security and resulting in the need for expensive repairs.

 

Finally, roofs, exterior facades and signage can be seriously damaged by pest-bird droppings and nesting materials. Roofs, especially, can be prohibitively expensive to repair or replace. The acid in bird droppings can quickly eat into painted signs and plastic, ruin expensive entry monuments and artwork, and crumble stone facades. All the more reason to invest in bird proofing before damage occurs.

 

Bird Proofing Solutions

Today’s bird proofing solutions are humane and highly effective. Poisons and shotguns are out, scientifically designed bird deterrents are in. These are easy to install and virtually maintenance free. Most are visually unobtrusive and balance aesthetics with function.

 

Bird Spikes Get the Job Done

As an effective bird-proofing device, few deterrents come close to the Bird Spike. Birds have one heck of time trying to land anywhere near them. That’s because the menacing-looking spikes really intimidate most birds. The spikes come in stainless steel or rigid unbreakable polycarbonate. And while they look like they would impale a bird, the blunted spikes are harmless to birds or maintenance crews. Bird spikes can be used to deter a wide range of birds and work quite effectively on rooftops, signs, building ledges and other outdoor areas.

 

Bird Spiders for Smaller Areas

For smaller nooks crannies, there’s the Bird Spider. Like the bird spike, it keeps pest birds from landing and nesting. While bird spikes are motionless, a spider’s arms whip around in the breeze to catch a pest bird’s eye. Spiders come in different sizes (different length spider arms) to deter different bird species.

(more…)

Share

Why Bird-B-Gone?

Tuesday, April 5th, 2011

Bird-B-Gone, Inc.  -The Leader in Effective, Humane Bird Control Products.

Our people, products expertise and training make the difference.

Why choose Bird-B-Gone as your Bird Control provider?

Bird-B-Gone, Inc. is the worlds largest manufacturer of professional grade bird deterrents. Since 1992m our products have helped to solve pest bird problems in commercial, industrial and residential settings across the globe. Our superior products, excellent customer service, extensive product knowledge and innovation have helped to secure our position as the number one manufacturer and supplier of bird deterrents.

We pride ourselves on the personal relationships we build with our customers. At Bird-B-Gone, we measure our success by the success we create for our customers!

Bird-B-Gone is the only bird control manufacturer who can back up their products and guarantees with predictable success.

The Bird-B-Gone Difference:

  • Bird-B-Gone Products are humane, effective and carry industry leading guarantees.
  • We manufacture a majority of our own products at our facility in the U.S.  ensuring the highest quality products at the lowest prices!
  • Our bird control engineers have a combined 80+ years of hands on experience. They are there to give professional advice on product installation.
  • We are the only Bird Control company with an on staff Ornithologist to help teach and advise our customers
  • We offer free training and support for all aspects of bird control including on site training and technical support
  • We regularly host a free training course – Bird-B-Gone university, that teaches everything from quoting a bird job to product installation
  • We offer same day and express shipping, even on custom netting
  • Our products are available worldwide through a network of quality distributors
Share

Thinking Outside the Big Box

Friday, March 25th, 2011

Bird Control for Big Box Stores

Written By: Dr. Rob Fergus

 

About: Dr. Rob Fergus is an ornithologist who specializes in urban ecology and human/wildlife interactions.  Dr. Fergus received his Ph.D. in urban bird conservation from the University of Texas at Austin. He has teamed up with Bird-B-Gone as the official Bird-B-Gone Ornithologist to help close the gap between the science of nature, and the nature of bird control.


Every once in a while when I’m traveling, I see a House Sparrow flying around inside an airport terminal somewhere.  One day I actually saw seven together when I was waiting for a connection in the Cincinnati Airport!

 

Airport terminals, retail stores, warehouses, and other large buildings often attract birds—usually house sparrows, European starlings, and rock pigeons (the more formal name ornithologists call pigeons).  Keeping them off the building is usually possible with a well designed system of physical bird deterrents like bird spikes.  But what can you do when the birds get inside the building?

 

First item of business if you have a bird inside is to figure out how the bird is getting in.  If there aren’t obvious answers—like doors left open—then the bird is a messenger telling you that you have a hole or some other problem with your building that you need to fix to keep the bird out, and to keep your building climate controlled and otherwise secure.


If you have a warehouse or other building with open dock doors or other openings that are always open, keeping birds out will be more of a challenge.  Look to see if you can install a door—or at least a vinyl strip doors or other type of seal or barrier.  If you don’t seal up the door, you are going to have birds coming inside looking for nesting or food opportunities, or just to get in out of the weather.  Urban sparrows, starlings, and pigeons are crafty creatures, always looking for ways to get inside.  Some have even been observed waiting by doors or even triggering automatic doors to enter buildings!

 

After you’ve taken care of the source of your problem, how do you get the birds out?  If possible, shut off all the lights in the building and open up the doors—birds will usually go towards the light and fly out on their own.  If this isn’t possible, you can use a live trap to catch the birds and take them outside.  Traps can also be used to catch and release birds that get inside if you aren’t able to seal up their entryway.  Mist netting can be used by professional bird control specialists to remove birds as well. Birds fly into the net, get tangled and are taken outside and released.

 

House Sparrows, European Starlings, and Rock Pigeons are not native American bird species—they were brought here in past centuries—so they are not protected by federal laws that protect native birds.  That means you can humanely dispatch the birds if need be, but it is always better to use non-lethal means to deal with your bird issues whenever possible. After all, removing the birds is not actually taking away the ability for new ones to return.  Keeping birds out of your big box store should be easy enough to do with the simple steps outlined above.

 

If for some reason you still have trouble with birds, feel free to give us a call (toll free at 877-820-8205) to discuss Bird-B-Gone products that might work in your specific situation.

Share

New York Public Library installs bird netting to protect the building’s architectural features

Thursday, February 3rd, 2011

From WNYC.ORG:

New York Public Library Gets A Face-Lift

By Abbie Fentress Swanson: Interactive Content Producer

Wednesday, February 02, 2011

City officials joined New York Public Library President Paul LeClerc to celebrate the three-year, $50 million restoration of the Stephen A. Schwarzman building on 42nd Street on Tuesday.

The landmark Beaux-Arts building, known to some as the Great Library Building or the People’s Palace, was designed by the architects Carrère and Hastings before it opened on May 23, 1911. But a survey in 2006 revealed severe deterioration and soiling of the façade, especially in the Corinthian column capitals, lion head keystones and scroll modillions. The architecture and engineering firm that did the survey, Wiss, Janney, Elstner Associates, Inc., said that the deterioration was mostly sugaring due to acid raid, diesel exhaust and pigeon guano, among other things. There was also roof damage, oxidation of the building’s bronze doors and cracking on sculptures. Birds had made the façade their home. The library decided to try to restore it. “Our intention was to make the building look like it was when it was built,” said LeClerc.

After millions of dollars were raised, an architectural and conservation team set out to repair 7,000 instances of deterioration in 2008 on the 150,000 square-foot façade. Over three years, some 18,000 square feet of bird netting was installed. “Over 1,000 cracks were repaired. Over 2,000 hand-carved marble patches, or dutchmen, were installed and nearly 900 marble balusters were replaced,” said LeClerc.

Read the complete article here

_____________________________________________________________________________________________

From Bird-B-Gone, Inc.:

“New York Public Library installs bird netting to protect the building’s architectural features”

Many cities, municipalities and property owners install Bird Netting to protect historic buildings. Bird Netting is a humane way of blocking birds from getting to unwanted areas where droppings and nesting materials can ruin and stain facades and corrode building materials. Bird Netting is effective for all bird species and can be installed to keep birds off buildings, rooftops, eaves, warehouses, rafters and other areas.

Heavy Duty Bird Net from Bird-B-Gone carriers an industry leading 10 year guarantee and is available in stock sizes and custom cuts. We also offer a complete line of professional grade hardware to ensure your bird net installation lasts.Visit us online at http://www.birdbgone.com/products/bird-netting/ or call us at 1-800-392-6915 for additional details.

Don’t have the time, resources or staff to install bird netting? We have a network of trained authorized installers across the globe who can install bird netting and other bird exclusion products. Call us today at 1-800-392-6915 for an installer in your area.

Share

Pigeon Control Said Necissary in Recent Pompeii Collapses

Tuesday, December 14th, 2010

From News Daily:

A statue is seen in front of a long section of a rustic retaining wall in the garden of the House of the Moralist, which collapsed after heavy rains in Pompeii November 30, 2010. REUTERS/Ciro De Luca

“Pompeii collapses spark worry and outrage”


By Philip Pullella

Posted 2010/12/13 at 12:25 pm EST



POMPEII, Italy, Dec. 13, 2010 (Reuters) — Pompeii mayor Claudio D’Alessio does not want to go down in history linked with Pliny the Younger, the Roman who chronicled the destruction of the ancient city nearly 2,000 ago in an eruption of Mount Vesuvius.

The collapses sparked charges of official neglect by Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi’s center-right government and calls for the resignation of Culture Minister Sandro Bondi, who has imposed cuts to arts spending as part of austerity measures.

….

“We must invest in regular maintenance. This does not attract attention but is very necessary,” said Cevoli, adding that removing weeds from roofs and walls is not as enticing as light shows and holograms but it does stop water infiltration.

Cevoli says there have been seven collapses in a year but not all of them have received the publicity they deserved.

Judith Harris, author of the 2007 book “Pompeii Awakened,” said it would be important that sponsors let archaeologists do what they feel is necessary.

“There is no glamour in pigeon control and weed removal but they are necessary,” she said.

Read The Original Post Here

_________________________________________________________________________

From Bird-B-Gone:

Pigeon droppings have been the source of deterioration and defilement on historic sites across the world. Recent renovations on Italy’s famed Leaning Tower of Pisa included the removal of pigeon droppings which had soiled many of the towers stones.  Herculaneum, a lesser known city also buried in Mt. Vesuvius’s eruption in 79 AD was also recently having problems with pigeon droppings wearing away roofs and walls of the ruins. Damage done by bird droppings on a 14th century cathedral ending up costing the city of Milan and extra $7.9m or more in repairs.

Bird droppings are acidic and will eat through paint, and corrode building materials such as stone and metal. Left unattended, affected areas may need restoration or complete replacement. Whether it’s an irreplaceable historic monument, or a contemporary roof or building, it is important to address pigeons or bird problems when they are noticed. The sooner a bird problem is addressed, the easrier it will be to persuade the birds to move on.

Bird-B-Gone offers a complete line of effective and humane bird deterrents to help prevent birds from nesting or roosting on homes, buildings, warehouses, and other areas. Visit http://www.birdbgone.com to learn more about our extensive line of professional grade bird control products including bird netting, bird spikes, bird repellents, electric bird deterrents, bird slope, and more. If you want advice for your particular bird problem, please call us at 1-800-392-6915 or email nobirds@birdbgone.com

Share
Get Adobe Flash player