Posts Tagged ‘bird droppings’

Pigeons cause structural damage on bridge

Tuesday, July 10th, 2012

Bridge pigeons’ days are numbered 

Article Shared From: The Otago Daily Times / NZ

Written By: Sarah Marquet

Pigeon poo is threatening the Alexandra bridge across the Clutha River, so the birds have to go.

New Zealand Transport Agency (NZTA) senior asset manager John Jarvis said the bridge’s structural steel was being corroded and, while it was not an immediate safety risk, action was needed to reduce the 400-strong flock of resident pigeons so damaged areas could be repaired.

The corrosion mostly affected the surface, but there were also some cases of pitting. (more…)

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Witham: Call for action to keep pigeon droppings off pavement

Thursday, May 31st, 2012

A Small English Community Calls for Bird Control Measures

Article Shared From: Braintree and Witham Times

Drastic action is being called for to clean up a street covered in pigeon droppings.

Guithavon Street, in Witham, has been condemned as “filthy” by businesses, shoppers and councillors.

Although Braintree Council cleans the pavements, it insists that pigeon control is the responsibility of those who own and lease property in the road.

Read more in this week’s Witham and Braintree Times.

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6 Feet of Bird Droppings in Abandoned University Chimney

Wednesday, April 18th, 2012

A researcher takes a sample from the two-metre chimney swift guano deposit inside a chimney at Ontario's Queen's University. (Chris Grooms/Queen's University)

6 feet of bird droppings discovered in an abandoned chimney at Ontario University is being “excavated” for clues on the decline of Chimney Swifts in the area. The 6 foot tower of bird droppings have sat in the tower ever since it was sealed off with bird netting in 1993, but represented 50 years worth of “deposits”.

“Bird poo tower could prove research goldmine”

Article Shared From: CBS News

Written By: Max Paris, Environment Unit, CBC News

A two-metre tower of bird excrement at an Ontario university has become an unlikely archive that may reveal the reasons for the declining population of the North American chimney swift, according to new research by Canadian scientists.

The study published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B document the discovery and cataloguing of the droppings in an abandoned chimney on the campus of Queen’s University in Kingston, Ont.

“What we have is a history book that we didn’t think we had before,” said Dr. John Smol, one of the study’s authors. Smol went on to explain that, to his knowledge, this is the first time anyone has ever measured stratified towers of bird droppings. (more…)

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Bird Droppings Cause of High E-Coli Counts at Bayfront Beach…

Monday, November 28th, 2011

Pier 4 style changes can help Bayfront Beach, public health says 

From: The Hamilton Spectator
Sun Nov 27 2011

Hamilton public health will submit A Tale of Two Beaches to the board of health Monday, backing up the need for structural and bird management changes at Bayfront Park.

Dr. Chris Mackie, associate medical officer of health at Hamilton’s Public Health Services, says the reports supports changes to improve water quality at Bayfront Park — where bird droppings are a major factor in excessive E. coli bacteria counts — and offers the “significant” improvement following such measures at Pier 4 to back it up.

Changes at Pier 4 have resulted in fewer closure days since stakeholders — including the city, Bay Area Restoration Council, public works, public health, the Hamilton Harbour Remedial Action Plan (RAP) and National Water Research Institute — began adding bird control measures and surface drainage capability at Pier 4 in August 2005.

(more…)

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The Skinny on Bird Poop

Wednesday, August 17th, 2011

Written by resident Bird-B-Gone Ornithologist: Dr. Rob Fergus

About: Dr. Rob Fergus is an ornithologist who specializes in urban ecology and human/wildlife interactions. Dr. Fergus received his Ph.D. in urban bird conservation from the University of Texas at Austin.  After founding the Hornsby Bend Bird Observatory in Austin, Texas he created additional bird conservation programs in Austin as the first executive director of the  Travis Audubon Society.  From 2004 to 2009  he was the Senior Scientist for Urban Bird Conservation at the National Audubon Society. Dr. Rob has teamed up with Bird-B-Gone to help answer pest bird questions closing the gap between the science of nature, and the nature of bird control.


Lets face it, most of us like to have birds around, but we have a problem with their droppings.  The major complaint about bird droppings involve unsightly or smelly messes, concerns about property damage, as well as potential health risks.

Unsightly or Smelly Messes

Most of the time this is the real problem with bird droppings—we just don’t want to see them.  While that is certainly understandable, birds are part of our natural environment so we shouldn’t be too upset about the occasional bird dropping on our car, house, or patio furniture.  Bird droppings become more of a problem when we create structures like window sills, decks, or utility lines where birds come to sit frequently and do their duty.  If bird droppings are accumulating the first thing to look at is how to alter the landscape so that the birds can’t physically come and sit where they are making the mess.  This may be done with architectural or structural modifications to a building or other structure, or by installing bird spikes or some other physical deterrents to keep the birds from being able to land where they want to sit.

Property Damage

More rarely accumulations of bird droppings may cause actual structural damage to buildings, bridges, machinery, and automobiles.  Bird droppings are acidic, which may cause some damage, but for automobiles the greater damage is done when car finishes expand in the sun and then contract around the dried bird dropping.  When birds eat berries, their droppings may stain paint, wood, or stucco.  To avoid property damage, wash bird droppings from any surface you want to protect as soon as possible.  Use a hose with a spray nozzle or a wet rag.   If the dropping has hardened, soak it with a wet rag or paper towel for ten minutes to soften it before rinsing or wiping it off.  You may want to use a household cleaner or a detergent formulated specifically for killing disease organisms associated with bird mess cleanups such as the Microcide SQ Disinfectant.

Potential Health Risks

Bird droppings may carry dozens of disease organisms that can be transmitted to people.  Risk to most people is usually small, but may be greater for young people, old people, and those with compromised immune systems.  It is always better to avoid contact with bird droppings when possible, and to clean up thoroughly following the general cleanup procedures outlined by the Internet Center for Wildlife Damage Management.  The following are the two main diseases that people may get from contact with bird droppings, usually after close contact with large accumulations of droppings and mostly from breathing in fungus that grows on the droppings:

 

  • Histoplasmosis is a disease caused by a contact with or inhalation of a fungus (Histoplasma capsulatum) which grows on bird and bat droppings.  Many people are infected without developing symptoms, but the very young and old, and those with compromised immune systems are at increased risk of developing severe infections.  Avoid areas with accumulations of bird droppings and if you have to clean up such a site, follow the directions in Histoplasmosis-Protecting Workers at Risk.  For more information see the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website.
  • Cryptococcosis is another fungal disease contracted mostly by breathing in the fungal cells of Cryptococcus neoformans growing on bird droppings.  Sometimes the disease causes pneumonia-like symptoms, while other times it spreads to the nervous system causing cryptococcal meningitis.  For more information see the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website.
  • Other Diseases that may be transmitted from birds to humans through droppings include:

If you have concerns about possible exposure to these diseases, please contact your doctor or a health care professional.  For more specific information about bird control products to keep birds from landing and making a mess on your building or other structure, check out physical deterrents that might work in your situation, submit a specific question to  nobirds@birdbgone.com, or call a Bird-B-Gone bird control specialist toll free at 800-392-6915.

 

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Article from My San Antonio: Cell revolution’s underside: tower bird droppings

Friday, July 22nd, 2011
Written By: MARK RANZENBERGER, Morning Sun (Mount Pleasant)
Published 08:41 a.m., Monday, June 6, 2011

UNION TOWNSHIP, Mich. (AP) — It’s a dirty job, but later this summer, a crew of steeplejacks will help Isabella County’s Union Township deal with the unintended consequences of the mobile communications revolution.

The crew from Fedewa Inc. of Nashville, Mich., will climb atop the township’s water tower at Broadway Road and U.S. 127 with high-intensity power washers. That tower, located strategically along the freeway near Mount Pleasant, is valuable “vertical real estate” for mobile communications providers, and a forest of antennas sits atop of water tower’s bell.

Those antennas are great places for birds to roost. They’ve also left behind substantial signs that they’ve been there in the form of, um, organic material, according to township Public Works Coordinator Kim Smith.

“We should clean there every three to five years,” Smith said.

Five years’ worth of bird droppings can start to damage the paint on the water towers, Smith said. Painting a water tower isn’t cheap; typically, it might cost $100,000.

(more…)

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A young New Brunswick woman was blinded and nearly killed simply by coming into contact with pigeon feces…

Monday, May 23rd, 2011

From the Ottawa Citizen:

‘Please don’t feed the pigeons’

A young New Brunswick woman was blinded and nearly killed simply by coming into contact with pigeon feces. Michael Staples tells the heartbreaking tale of a life torn apart

By Michael Staples, Fredericton Daily Gleaner April 26, 2011

In just a few weeks, Erica Richards has been transformed from a vibrant 23-year-old who loved nature into a woman who’s battling for her life.

In early January, Richards contracted a potentially fatal condition called cryptococcal meningitis, a fungal disease carried in the feces of pigeons.

The debilitating illness attacks the spine and the brain, causing severe swelling. It left her confined to a hospital bed in a state of delirium for weeks.

But the most devastating consequence of the sickness is that Richards is now blind.

“Be aware of this disease. It could kill a child in a heartbeat,” Richards said from her hospital bed.

“It could kill a senior in a heartbeat without you even having to worry about the symptoms. It comes on that fast. If you don’t realize the symptoms, it could kill you, too.”

Richards’ warning comes on the heels of Fredericton city council’s approval earlier this month of a recommendation it toughen its animal-control bylaw to make it illegal to feed pigeons.

While such complaints are unusual, a problem exists on the city’s Grandame Street with a property owner who refuses to stop feeding the birds. The pigeons are roosting on roofs and defecating.

(more…)

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Pigeon droppings make workers sick; court upholds OSHA fine

Thursday, March 31st, 2011

Company fined for not protecting workers against pigeon droppings

From: Safety News Alert

March 29, 2011 by Fred Hosier

An administrative law judge with the Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission has upheld fines against an Ohio company. An inspection revealed several employees had symptoms of a potentially fatal respiratory disease after sweeping up pigeon droppings.

OSHA opened an investigation against ALL Erection & Crane Rental Corp. in June 2009 after a worker was struck in the head by debris during the cleanup of a 600,000-square-foot factory building in Cleveland that was owned by the company.

ALL Erection hired subcontractor Labor Ready to remove debris, including pigeon waste, from the building.

The inspection revealed several workers had symptoms of histoplasmosis as a result of inhaling dust created by sweeping and shoveling the bird waste.

ALL Erection contested the citations on the grounds that the workers were employed by Labor Ready. The judge rejected the argument because workers were being supervised by ALL Erection and the company was controlling the manner of the work being accomplished.

The judge upheld five serious citations against the company for failure to provide:

  • guarding for a fifth floor elevator shaft
  • personal protective equipment
  • compliant respirators
  • medical personnel for advice and consultation, and
  • training for employees on hazardous chemicals in the workplace.

The judge also upheld a less-than-serious citation for failing to determine the presence, quantity and location of asbestos-containing material. A serious citation for failing to provide an assessment for lead was dismissed.

ALL Erection was assessed $10,850.

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Pigeon droppings make workers sick; court upholds OSHA fine

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Stench at So. Cal. beach blamed on bird droppings

Tuesday, March 8th, 2011

From the OC register:

That south county stink? Try a bird-poop cocktail

TEXT BY BRITTANY LEVINE, PHOTO BY PAUL BERSEBACH

Article Tab : landfill-contracts-juan-d

The good news: The stench at a Dana Point beach is temporary.

The bad news: It may come back.

The December storms caused San Juan Creek to flood from San Juan Capistrano to Dana Point and caused ferocious 5.72 feet-per-second currents to rush through the creek. The creek water outfall at Doheny State Beach was then flushed into the ocean.

That mixture is behind the rotten egg smell near the lifeguard headquarters.

Bird poop and other organic matter that had accumulated in the creek mixed with sulfates in the ocean water, said David Pryor, an environmental scientist with the state Department of Parks and Recreation.

The combination made a stinky smell—similar to that of sulfur-rich hot springs. The smell was greatest following the storms. Then debris covered up most of the bird poop-salt water cocktail, plant materials and bacteria that had soaked into the sand. But recent beach cleanups aimed at removing debris unleashed the stench again.

“We do not consider the odor dangerous,” Pryor said in an e-mail.

Over time, the surf and tides will sort and wash away the stinky matter, he said.

Read the complete article here

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From Bird-B-Gone Inc.

Just last year, the Lompoc Record reported that it was an accumulation of pigeon droppings that had contaminated the water quality under the Pismo Beach Pier. Sure the stench may not be harmful, what about the bacteria found in bird droppings? It would take a lot of  droppings to create such a stench – if it truly is the source of the “fowl” smell, the city may want to consider the health risk associated with the droppings.  In small doses it usually doesn’t cause that big of a concern, but when found in such large quantities, health risks should be considered as bird droppings are known to carry bacteria and disease.

There are many products available to humanely deter birds from open spaces. Not sure which product is right for you? Contact our team of bird control engineers to help you choose and design the right bird deterrent system for you. Bird-B-Gone also has a network of authorized installers who can install bird control products call 1-800-392-6915 or visit http://www.birdbgone.com

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Pigeon Control Said Necissary in Recent Pompeii Collapses

Tuesday, December 14th, 2010

From News Daily:

A statue is seen in front of a long section of a rustic retaining wall in the garden of the House of the Moralist, which collapsed after heavy rains in Pompeii November 30, 2010. REUTERS/Ciro De Luca

“Pompeii collapses spark worry and outrage”


By Philip Pullella

Posted 2010/12/13 at 12:25 pm EST



POMPEII, Italy, Dec. 13, 2010 (Reuters) — Pompeii mayor Claudio D’Alessio does not want to go down in history linked with Pliny the Younger, the Roman who chronicled the destruction of the ancient city nearly 2,000 ago in an eruption of Mount Vesuvius.

The collapses sparked charges of official neglect by Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi’s center-right government and calls for the resignation of Culture Minister Sandro Bondi, who has imposed cuts to arts spending as part of austerity measures.

….

“We must invest in regular maintenance. This does not attract attention but is very necessary,” said Cevoli, adding that removing weeds from roofs and walls is not as enticing as light shows and holograms but it does stop water infiltration.

Cevoli says there have been seven collapses in a year but not all of them have received the publicity they deserved.

Judith Harris, author of the 2007 book “Pompeii Awakened,” said it would be important that sponsors let archaeologists do what they feel is necessary.

“There is no glamour in pigeon control and weed removal but they are necessary,” she said.

Read The Original Post Here

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From Bird-B-Gone:

Pigeon droppings have been the source of deterioration and defilement on historic sites across the world. Recent renovations on Italy’s famed Leaning Tower of Pisa included the removal of pigeon droppings which had soiled many of the towers stones.  Herculaneum, a lesser known city also buried in Mt. Vesuvius’s eruption in 79 AD was also recently having problems with pigeon droppings wearing away roofs and walls of the ruins. Damage done by bird droppings on a 14th century cathedral ending up costing the city of Milan and extra $7.9m or more in repairs.

Bird droppings are acidic and will eat through paint, and corrode building materials such as stone and metal. Left unattended, affected areas may need restoration or complete replacement. Whether it’s an irreplaceable historic monument, or a contemporary roof or building, it is important to address pigeons or bird problems when they are noticed. The sooner a bird problem is addressed, the easrier it will be to persuade the birds to move on.

Bird-B-Gone offers a complete line of effective and humane bird deterrents to help prevent birds from nesting or roosting on homes, buildings, warehouses, and other areas. Visit http://www.birdbgone.com to learn more about our extensive line of professional grade bird control products including bird netting, bird spikes, bird repellents, electric bird deterrents, bird slope, and more. If you want advice for your particular bird problem, please call us at 1-800-392-6915 or email nobirds@birdbgone.com

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Authorities investigating what role pigeon poop played in man’s death

Wednesday, August 18th, 2010

From the National post:

Scott Barbour/Getty Images

Too much pigeon poo might have caused an awning to fall and kill a man in Australia.

August 18, 2010 – 11:00 am

Could an overabundance of pigeon poop have caused an awning to crash down and kill an Australian man?

That’s what authorities are trying to figure out through a five-day inquest into what caused Craig Taylor to be crushed to death.

Mr. Taylor, 53, had been taking shelter from a storm under a pharmacy’s awning when it collapsed in December, 2007, the Daily Telegraph reports. Dozens of pigeons were apparently nesting in the structure. Live birds were even found in the wreckage.

Authorities think the weight of the pigeons’ droppings, combined with the heavy rain, could have caused the awning to fall.

The Sydney Morning Herald reported in 2008:

A structural examination of Hadley’s Chemist found the cause of collapse was a lack of maintenance, poor workmanship and a large quantity of pigeon droppings.

The droppings had built up and had become saturated by the rain leaking into the roof.

The report found that crucial structural points on the awning were poorly maintained and badly corroded, although this would have been difficult to examine before the collapse.

The coroner’s office is investigating what role store owners and the city have in keeping awnings clear of pigeons, and who exactly should be responsible for the structures’ maintenance.

This wasn’t the first awning collapse in Australia. Six-months earlier another fell in Fairlight, Australia, but no one was injured. There’s no word on whether pigeon poop played a role in that incident.

______________________________________________

From Bird-B-Gone:

The sooner you address a bird problem, the easier it will be to take care of .
Did you know that besides carrying over 60 transmittable diseases, bird droppings can corrode paint, metal, stone and masonry? If you notice birds congregating under a sign, awning or eave area, call Bird-B-Gone, Inc. Bird-B-Gone has a complete line of effective and humane products to help solve any bird problem. Can’t/ don’t want to take care of the problem yourself? Bird-B-Gone has a network of authorized installers who can come out and and remedy your pest bird problem. Call us at 1-800-392-6915 or email us at nobirds@birdbgone.com / visit us online at http://www.birdbgone.com
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Concert Shut Down by Pigeon Poop

Monday, July 26th, 2010

From People:

Kings of Leon Concert Shut Down by Pigeon Poop

By Stephen M. SilvermanKings of Leon Concert Shut Down by Pigeon Poop

Sunday July 25, 2010 09:50 AM EDT

LEGO; Amy Sussman/Getty

Three songs into their St. Louis concert Friday night, the Kings of Leon had to shut down the show on account of some unexpected accompaniment that CNN pins on “pooping pigeons.”

“Jared [Followill, the band's bassist] was hit several times during the first two songs,” said Andy Mendelsohn of Vector Management. “It’s not only disgusting – it’s a toxic health hazard. They really tried to hang in there.”

The dirty birds were reported to have been lurking in the rafters of the Missouri city’s Verizon Amphitheater and launching their aerial attack during the band’s opening number, “Closer.” Followill, 23, got it in the face.

Read the Complete Article Here

From Bird-B-Gone:

Amphitheater’s can be very inviting for pigeons and other birds as lighting and sound equipment in rafter areas provide plenty of high perches to sit or roost on… and when the birds get hungry, they have concert goers to thank. Beyond being a hazard for entertainers or anyone else below rafter areas, bird droppings can corrode building materials and ruin equipment. Cleanup of bird droppings in high profile areas can run maintenance costs into the thousands.

Something as simple as bird spikes could have helped to prevent this unfortunate scenario, leaving a disgusted band, and thousands of disappointed concert goers. It’s always best to tackle a bird problem as soon as it is noticed, that way the birds won’t become territorial and will be easier to move on.  There are bird control professionals across the nation who can help with pest bird problems in commercial, residential or industrial areas. If you have a bird problem, and need help or advice, call Bird-B-Gone, Inc. Bird-B-Gone has a network of authorized installers – bird control professionals in your area that can help do everything from clean-up to installation of products to keep birds away. Bird-B-Gone has a complete line of effective and humane bird control products to choose from. Visit http://www.birdbgone.com or call us at 1-800-392-6915, our Bird Control Engineers are here to help. We even work with an Ornithologist to help tackle the toughest “bird jobs”.

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Pigeon Droppings Cause Shutdown of Road

Wednesday, July 14th, 2010

Pigeons’ Preferred Perch Plagues Pavement With Poop

Brownsboro Road Closed For Cleanup Tuesday

POSTED: 4:06 pm EDT July 13, 2010


LOUISVILLE, Ky. —

//

A local road was partially shut down Tuesday night as crews worked to clean up massive amounts of pigeon droppings from under an overpass.

Click Here: View Images

Brownsboro Road beneath Interstate 265 was down to one lane in both directions from 6:30 until 10 p.m. Tuesday.”We just have some areas where the pigeons roost a lot and the bird droppings, they start to mound up. They build up quite a bit,” said Andrea Clifford, a spokeswoman for the Kentucky Department of Highways. And the pigeon droppings were not scattered — the median under the overpass was covered in a thick layer of the stuff.”It’s more of a sanitation issue. We get complaints about it and go out and do it,” Clifford said.

Read the complete article  HERE

From Bird-B-Gone:

Pigeon droppings can end up costing communities thousands of dollars per year – just for clean-up. Bird deterrents like the Bird-B-Gone Bird Spikes or Bird Net 2000 could be installed to block birds from getting back to these areas, saving this county time and money. Bird-B-Gone sells a complete line of effective and humane bird control products to help solve virtually any pest bird problem. To learn more, visit us online at http://www.birdbgone.com

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Pigeon waste ruins historical plaque

Wednesday, July 7th, 2010

Pigeons, Post Riders and Neglected Local History

Submitted by NewRochelle101 on Tue, 07/06/2010 – 22:18.

On the holiday weekend there was a fun and free New Rochelle trolley tour about local history. During the tour, tour guide and Habitat for Humanity director Jim Killoran mentioned the Post Rider plaque installed in downtown New Rochelle outside of the HSBC Bank.

The Post Riders delivered messages from the armies in the Revolutionary War. The NY Post ran an article about the Post Road and the Riders on July 4th, linked here: The Road that Paved the Way to Revolution I went to look at the plaque and it was covered in pigeon waste, really awful, almost impossible to read.”

Read the complete article at New Rochelle Talk

Pigeon droppings are not only unsightly, left unattended they can corrode building materials such as steel and stone, can stain surfaces, and discolor paint.  Installing bird deterrents is a simple way to keep surfaces free of bird feces. A few bird spikes on the top of this sign would surely take care of the problem! They are easy to install and require no maintenance, and easy humane way for New Rochelle to preserve a part of local history.

Visit Bird-B-Gone, Inc for a complete line of effective and humane bird control products!

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WebMD — Bacteria on pigeons said to cause more diarrhea than Salmonella

Tuesday, July 6th, 2010

Spanish researchers find two bugs on feral pigeons which cause illness in humans

WebMD Health News

Reviewed by Dr Rob Hicks

By Nicky Broyd

22nd June 2010 – Sampling of pigeons captured on the streets of Madrid has revealed the bacteria they carry. Researchers writing in BioMed Central’s open access journal Acta Vetinaria Scandinavica found two bugs that were highly prevalent in the bird population and which cause illness in humans: Chlamydia psittaci and Campylobacter jejuni.

The study

Fernando Esperón from the Animal Health Research Center, in Madrid, worked with a team of researchers to analyse blood and enema samples taken from 118 pigeons caught using gun-propelled nets.

The study found extremely high prevalence of bacteria which can be transferred from feral pigeons to humans.  Esperón said in news release there was no way to tell if the birds were infected: “This leads to the hypothesis that pigeons act as asymptomatic reservoirs of Chlamydia psittaci and Campylobacter jejuni. These birds may therefore pose a public health risk to the human population.”

Read the complete WebMD article

When pigeons try to roost or nest on or around your home or business, Bird-B-Gone, Inc  has you covered with a complete line of effective and humane bird control products. The sooner you address a bird problem, the better results you will get. The longer pigeons or other birds are allowed to inhabit an area, the harder it will be to get them to leave.

Have a pigeon or bird problem? Visit Bird-B-Gone, Inc. today, or call us at 1-800-392-6915.

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How to Clean up Pest Bird Droppings

Friday, August 14th, 2009

How to Clean Up Pest Bird Droppings!

Each year pest birds such as pigeons, seagulls and crows cause thousands in damage and clean up costs to building owners, homeowners and government agencies.  Pest bird droppings can carry over 60 transmittable diseases.  Several of these diseases have been known to be transmitted to humans and other animals.  Even though these diseases pose minor public health threats, they can be further minimized if safety measures are taken. Wearing protective clothing like disposable coveralls, boots, gloves, and respirators should be used for protection.

If a high-powered water hose is used to strip off dried bird droppings, dust control measures such as containing the area with plastic sheeting, should be taken. Wetting down the work area will prevent inhalation, reduce the risk of infection and will also prevent the spread of dust outside the work area. Those with a compromised immune system such as people living with HIV/AIDS or cancer patients should not be directly involved in the removal of the droppings. Always wash hands and any exposed skin before eating or drinking and when finished with work.

Several alternatives to using a high-powered water hose exist. One such alternative includes soaking the droppings with water and then shoveling it into a disposable container.   Workers should never clean DRY bird droppings from surfaces as the dust might be inhaled and transmit disease to the worker. The wet material should be collected in heavy-duty plastic bags or another type of secure container and discarded with the regular trash.

Once the structures are cleaned they may also be disinfected.  You can use a simple solution of ammonia or bleach and water and apply to the surface to disinfect and remove the odor associated with pest bird droppings.

The key to reducing the risk of disease from bird droppings is to create an environment that excludes them from affected areas:

1)     Eliminate Food Sources

  1. Clean up trash bins and garbage areas
  2. Discourage people from feeding birds
  3. Pick up trash and food scraps in outdoor eating areas

2)     Eliminate Nesting / Roosting Areas

  1. Use some sort of physical deterrent to keep birds from landing and roosting on flat surfaces; sound deterrents to scare pest birds from outdoor areas or visual deterrents to keep them out of gardens and vineyards.

3)     Call For Help!

  1. Contact a local pest control or animal control company and have them install a bird control system.

It is important to keep buildings and other areas that people inhabit free of pest birds and their debris.  Installing a bird control system will save time and money spent on clean up of bird droppings and damage made by the birds.

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