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Bird Deterrent | Bird•B•Gone Blog - Part 2

Posts Tagged ‘bird deterrent’

When and Where to use Bird Spikes

Friday, May 25th, 2012

Written By: Meredith Walako/ Bird-B-Gone, Inc. 5-25-12

Bird Spikes, they were invented in the 1940′s and have since become a staple tool in bird control. While they’re not quite a household name or known product, many professionals have familiarized themselves with the concept. And though there have been several advancements in bird deterrents since, such as automatic remote hazing units and electric track systems, Bird Spikes still play an important role in deterring birds. It’s a simple product with very effective results, as long as they are used for what they are designed for.

Bird Spikes are a physical bird deterrent used to prevent birds from landing in unwanted areas. The Spikes are not sharp, and not designed to harm birds. They simply create an uneven landing space that large birds cannot land on. Bird-B-Gone is the only bird control company that manufactures their bird spikes in the USA, ensuring they meet the highest standard of quality in the industry.

Bird Spikes, just like any other wildlife, pest or bird control product are designed for specific situations and species. Birds are smart and adaptable -  finding the right product that fits your scenario is key in successful pest bird exclusion. The species of bird, the area they are causing a problem and whether or not the birds are nesting will dictate whether they are a viable option. In other words, Bird Spikes are not 100% effective everywhere they are installed, there are many pest bird scenarios that require a completely different solution. (more…)

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Birds Do Not Hear Ultrasonic Sounds

Friday, May 18th, 2012

Ultrasonic Bird Control? Don’t Throw Your Money Away! 

Written By: Rob Fergus, Ph.D.

Sometimes hardware or lawn & garden companies advertise ultrasonic devices that are supposed to drive birds away with high frequency noises undetectable to humans.  Sounds like a good idea, right?  Blast out sounds birds can hear but we can’t—what’s not to like?  Unfortunately, the truth is that birds do not actually hear these ultrasonic sounds any better than humans do, and there is no scientific evidence that these devices actually work. The bottom line is that birds cannot hear ultrasonic frequencies and ultrasonic devices don’t work.

Humans hear sounds between the frequencies of about 20 to 20,000 acoustical vibrations per second (hertz or Hz).  Middle C is about 262 Hz and the highest piano key (C8) is about 4186 Hz.   As you get older, you lose the higher frequency sounds; middle-aged people can often hear sounds only up to 12,000-14,000 Hz (12-14kHz).  High frequency dog whistles work because dogs can hear sounds up to 40-60 kHz.  Bats use sounds up to 100 kHz to help them locate their flying insect prey and avoid obstacles in the night sky.  (more…)

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Bird strike causes upvalley power surge

Friday, April 27th, 2012

Bird strike causes upvalley power surge

Article Shared From: The Weekly Calistogan / The Napa Valley Register

Written By: Sean Scully | Posted: Thursday, April 26, 2012 2:15 pm

A juvenile eagle flew into high-voltage power lines in the Palisades east of Calistoga on Wednesday, knocking out power briefly over a broad area of the Upvalley and knocking out Calistoga’s main emergency dispatch repeater.

Calistoga Fire Chief Steve Campbell said the eagle hit the lines shortly after noon, causing a power surge throughout the service area. It knocked down at least some power lines in St. Helena, he said.

A spokesman for PG&E did not return a phone call seeking details of the scope of the outage.

The only major damage appears to have been to the police dispatch radio, which is mounted on Calistoga’s fire house, Campbell said. (more…)

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Doritos® – Bird of Prey — Crash the Super Bowl 2012 Finalist

Monday, March 19th, 2012

This Doritos commercial aired during the 2012 Super Bowl and highlights how birds can be pests / pest bird issues:

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To Clean Up Subway Station, an Unlikely Tool: Bird Calls

Monday, March 19th, 2012

Bird-B-Gone’s Bird Chase Super Sonic unit was chosen to shoo birds from a NY Subway station

Article shared from: The NY Times

Librado Romero/The New York Times

Written by:

Published: March 18, 2012

Considering the setting, the sound is difficult to place: a song of the wild, evoking, perhaps, a disturbed rooster accompanied by a small chirping bird.

Every few minutes, the noises resume, an unlikely soundtrack at the entrance to Roosevelt Island subway station.

The bird calls come courtesy of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority, but the recorded sound is not the latest example of an underground art or music project. It is actually a weapon against trespassing pigeons.

The authority has had a problem with pigeons entering the station, and leaving their feathers, and more unsightly evidence, on and under the walls. The agency had used netting, similar to chicken wire, beneath the ceiling to try to keep the pigeons at bay. (more…)

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Preventative Maintenance: Check for Birds

Friday, March 9th, 2012

Article Written By Bird-B-Gone Featured on Buildings Magazine’s Website:

Click Here for The Original Post on Buildings.com

It’s been said “preventative maintenance is the best kind of maintenance.” If you routinely check your facilities operational systems and equipment, it will save you time and money. Problems are easier and less expensive to fix the sooner they are noticed. Bird control is no different.

Adding bird control to your routine maintenance checklist is a wise decision, considering the impact birds can make on your building. Bird control can save your company time and money, and bird problems are easier to solve the sooner they are detected.

Most preventive maintenance checklists include roofing, HVAC, lighting, furnaces, cooling towers and electrical systems. Birds can negatively impact nearly all of these areas, so including bird control in your regular maintenance makes sense. (more…)

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Bird-B-Gone Featured in Quality Assurance Magazine’s “10 Proactive Steps to Prevent Pests”

Tuesday, February 14th, 2012

Check “Preventing Bird Invasions” on Page 52!

 

Look inside >
50 51
Pest Prevention
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Pigeons Crowd Under Heat Lamps At ‘L’ Stops (With Video)

Thursday, January 26th, 2012

Article Shared From: CBS Local Chicago

Pigeons have been crowding under the heat lamps at CTA ‘L’ platforms. (Credit: Steve Miller/WBBM Newsradio/CBS)

Posted: January 26, 2012 5:57 AM

CHICAGO (CBS) — Commuters are calling it everything from cute to disgusting – dozens of pigeons warming themselves under the heating lamps at Loop ‘L’ stops.

As WBBM Newsradio’s Steve Miller reports, at some stops, the pigeons have crowded into the heat lamp stalls on the platforms to the point where there is no place left to stand.

“It’s like we’re being supplanted by the pigeons,” one woman said.

Most people politely let the pigeons have the space. Of course, that may have something to do with all the pigeon poop on the platform under the heaters.

“It’s kind of funny,” the commuter said. “But it’s also so dirty that people don’t even dare, trying to make their own way and get some space for themselves.”

The commuter was giving the pigeons a wide berth.

“I think it’s cute and disgusting at the same time.”

The Chicago Transit Authority says it has only gotten two complaints about pigeons this winter.

(more…)

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Great Review of Bird-B-Gone Products in Yachtsman Magazine

Monday, August 22nd, 2011

Bird-B-Gone products were mentioned in the August “About the Bay” Section in Yachtsman Magazine. To learn more about keeping birds off boats, visit http://www.birdbgone.com

From Yachtsman Magazine:

About The Bay – August 2011

My friend Rich Evans, who keeps his Skookum 57, Sheba Star, over in Brisbane Marina, says he is having terrific luck with a product called Bird-B-Gone. Rich lives out of state and was having a terrible problem with pigeons perching in the rigging and pooping all over his decks until he found this great device. Rich claims that Bird-B-Gone has rendered the pigeon problem nil. He says that several of his marina neighbors have purchased the product and all are more than satisfied with the results. Rich is thinking of selling Sheba and purchasing a new Nordhavn 86. His slip in Brisbane is 88 feet long and he wants to get his money’s worth. For more information on the bird thing, visit www.birdbgone.com or call 800/392-6915.

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Refinery to pay $850,000 for bird deaths

Tuesday, June 7th, 2011

Oil refinery ordered to pay $850,000 in penalties after dozens of migratory birds died in an oil retention pond. The deaths occur when birds mistake these toxic ponds as fresh water sources . Fines for killing migratory birds are steep, and many plants are looking at effective solutions for keeping birds safe including sound and visual deterrents set u around the area to try and dissuade birds. One effective bird control solution for retention ponds is installing a heavy duty netting over the pond suspended by perimeter posts. The bird netting would act as a physical barrier, preventing birds from accessing the water altogether.

From the Billings Gazette:

Refinery will pay $850,000 penalty for violations

KEN DRIESE/Casper Star-Tribune

By JEREMY FUGLEBERG

Casper Star-Tribune‌

| Posted: Monday, June 6, 2011 11:45 pm

CASPER, Wyo. — The owner of an oil refinery near Rawlins with a raft of pollution problems in recent years has agreed to a multi-million dollar settlement with state regulators regarding a 2010 incident that killed dozens of birds.

Sinclair Wyoming Refinery Co. will pay $850,000 for releasing oil into a wastewater evaporation pond at its refinery, the Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality announced Monday.

Sinclair also agreed to spend $4.5 million on equipment upgrades and training.

On April 25, 2010, the company notified state environmental regulators that oil had been released into one of the refinery’s wastewater evaporation ponds.

After the release, 80 migratory birds were found dead in the polluted pond, a company spokesman said shortly after the incident. The final number of birds affected was far higher, state regulators say.

Read the Complete article HERE

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Bird Proofing an Integral Part of Building Maintenance

Friday, April 8th, 2011

Like everything else you own or manage, buildings require regular maintenance to keep them from deteriorating. Regardless of the size of your building, certain specific tasks must be performed to ensure heating, cooling, ventilation, and air conditioning systems are operating properly and continue to meet health and safety codes. Bird proofing can prevent droppings, nests and other and other bird debris from damaging these important systems–systems that can be very costly to repair or replace.

 

Likewise, a building’s plumbing systems, drains, drinking fountains, sprinkler systems and the timers that control them must be kept free of bird droppings and other debris to function properly. The same holds true for outdoor walkways, tables and chairs used by employees. Bird proofing will keep disease-carrying droppings from contaminating these areas. They can also prevent costly litigation should someone slip and fall on bird droppings.

 

Exterior lighting and security cameras must be kept clear and fully functional to ensure the safety of visitors and employees. Bird droppings and nests can obscure and render these systems inoperative unless bird-proofing devices are installed. Similarly, exterior locks, doors and windows can jam up, leaving gaps in a building’s security and resulting in the need for expensive repairs.

 

Finally, roofs, exterior facades and signage can be seriously damaged by pest-bird droppings and nesting materials. Roofs, especially, can be prohibitively expensive to repair or replace. The acid in bird droppings can quickly eat into painted signs and plastic, ruin expensive entry monuments and artwork, and crumble stone facades. All the more reason to invest in bird proofing before damage occurs.

 

Bird Proofing Solutions

Today’s bird proofing solutions are humane and highly effective. Poisons and shotguns are out, scientifically designed bird deterrents are in. These are easy to install and virtually maintenance free. Most are visually unobtrusive and balance aesthetics with function.

 

Bird Spikes Get the Job Done

As an effective bird-proofing device, few deterrents come close to the Bird Spike. Birds have one heck of time trying to land anywhere near them. That’s because the menacing-looking spikes really intimidate most birds. The spikes come in stainless steel or rigid unbreakable polycarbonate. And while they look like they would impale a bird, the blunted spikes are harmless to birds or maintenance crews. Bird spikes can be used to deter a wide range of birds and work quite effectively on rooftops, signs, building ledges and other outdoor areas.

 

Bird Spiders for Smaller Areas

For smaller nooks crannies, there’s the Bird Spider. Like the bird spike, it keeps pest birds from landing and nesting. While bird spikes are motionless, a spider’s arms whip around in the breeze to catch a pest bird’s eye. Spiders come in different sizes (different length spider arms) to deter different bird species.

(more…)

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Why Bird-B-Gone?

Tuesday, April 5th, 2011

Bird-B-Gone, Inc.  -The Leader in Effective, Humane Bird Control Products.

Our people, products expertise and training make the difference.

Why choose Bird-B-Gone as your Bird Control provider?

Bird-B-Gone, Inc. is the worlds largest manufacturer of professional grade bird deterrents. Since 1992m our products have helped to solve pest bird problems in commercial, industrial and residential settings across the globe. Our superior products, excellent customer service, extensive product knowledge and innovation have helped to secure our position as the number one manufacturer and supplier of bird deterrents.

We pride ourselves on the personal relationships we build with our customers. At Bird-B-Gone, we measure our success by the success we create for our customers!

Bird-B-Gone is the only bird control manufacturer who can back up their products and guarantees with predictable success.

The Bird-B-Gone Difference:

  • Bird-B-Gone Products are humane, effective and carry industry leading guarantees.
  • We manufacture a majority of our own products at our facility in the U.S.  ensuring the highest quality products at the lowest prices!
  • Our bird control engineers have a combined 80+ years of hands on experience. They are there to give professional advice on product installation.
  • We are the only Bird Control company with an on staff Ornithologist to help teach and advise our customers
  • We offer free training and support for all aspects of bird control including on site training and technical support
  • We regularly host a free training course – Bird-B-Gone university, that teaches everything from quoting a bird job to product installation
  • We offer same day and express shipping, even on custom netting
  • Our products are available worldwide through a network of quality distributors
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Chlorine suggested for water contaminated by bird droppings

Thursday, March 17th, 2011

Bird-B-Gone, Inc.

Last year the city of White Rock experienced an EColi water scare when a small amount of bird droppings – 1 to 4 grams – seeped into a water reservoir. Now the town is looking into chlorinating water supplies and installing bird deterrents:

From the Nownewspaper.com:

White Rock should add chlorine to make water safer, EPCOR says

By Marisa Babic, Surrey Now March 17, 2011

WHITE ROCK – As a result of the contaminated water scare in White Rock last summer, the company that supplies the city’s drinking water is recommending the addition of chlorine.

David Rector, director of operations for EPCOR, said the move is necessary to ensure the safety of the water supply.

“We’re recommending chlorination for all of White Rock,” Rector said Wednesday in presenting a report into the incident that led to a boil-water advisory for the city.

Fraser Health officials issued the boil-water advisory on Aug. 20, 2010 after water authorities discovered low-level E. coli contamination in the water supply during routine testing.

Rector said an investigation has found that a tiny amount of bird droppings that had seeped through a gap in the hatch seal at the Merklin reservoir were the probable cause of the contamination.

“The amount of material that we estimate caused this contamination is on the order of one to four grams,” he said.

Read the complete article here

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High School Pigeon Cull Upsets Students

Tuesday, March 15th, 2011

From Perth Now:

Esperance lead scandal

ONLY SLEEPING: Mt Lawley High School students thought sedated pigeons were suffering “agonizing deaths”. Picture: Richard Polden Source: Perth Now

MT LAWLEY Senior High School students were distressed to witness what they believed was the “agonizing death” of pigeons when a bird control program involving sedation was carried out during recess time.

The Guardian Express received an anonymous letter from a student’s parent who was concerned the students had seen the incident which they thought was caused when the pigeons ate “poisoned pellets”.

Education Department infrastructure executive director James Thom confirmed a pest control program was recently carried out while students were in the playground.

“Steps will be taken to ensure that in the future contractors carry out this work while students are inside,” he said.

Read the complete story here

_______________________________________________________________________________

From Bird-B-Gone:

Using sedatives or poisons to control birds creates an empty space that other birds can fill. It doesn’t address the features attracting birds to the area such a continuous food source -  a scenario often seen on school campuses where students eat lunch.  Had the school installed physical bird deterrents, such as bird spikes, they could have permanently addressed the problem while keeping things calm around campus.

To learn more about physical bird deterrents, visit http://www.birdbgone.com. Bird-B-Gone has a complete line of humane bird deterrents used to prevent birds from landing or nesting in unwanted areas.

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Stench at So. Cal. beach blamed on bird droppings

Tuesday, March 8th, 2011

From the OC register:

That south county stink? Try a bird-poop cocktail

TEXT BY BRITTANY LEVINE, PHOTO BY PAUL BERSEBACH

Article Tab : landfill-contracts-juan-d

The good news: The stench at a Dana Point beach is temporary.

The bad news: It may come back.

The December storms caused San Juan Creek to flood from San Juan Capistrano to Dana Point and caused ferocious 5.72 feet-per-second currents to rush through the creek. The creek water outfall at Doheny State Beach was then flushed into the ocean.

That mixture is behind the rotten egg smell near the lifeguard headquarters.

Bird poop and other organic matter that had accumulated in the creek mixed with sulfates in the ocean water, said David Pryor, an environmental scientist with the state Department of Parks and Recreation.

The combination made a stinky smell—similar to that of sulfur-rich hot springs. The smell was greatest following the storms. Then debris covered up most of the bird poop-salt water cocktail, plant materials and bacteria that had soaked into the sand. But recent beach cleanups aimed at removing debris unleashed the stench again.

“We do not consider the odor dangerous,” Pryor said in an e-mail.

Over time, the surf and tides will sort and wash away the stinky matter, he said.

Read the complete article here

____________________________________________________________

From Bird-B-Gone Inc.

Just last year, the Lompoc Record reported that it was an accumulation of pigeon droppings that had contaminated the water quality under the Pismo Beach Pier. Sure the stench may not be harmful, what about the bacteria found in bird droppings? It would take a lot of  droppings to create such a stench – if it truly is the source of the “fowl” smell, the city may want to consider the health risk associated with the droppings.  In small doses it usually doesn’t cause that big of a concern, but when found in such large quantities, health risks should be considered as bird droppings are known to carry bacteria and disease.

There are many products available to humanely deter birds from open spaces. Not sure which product is right for you? Contact our team of bird control engineers to help you choose and design the right bird deterrent system for you. Bird-B-Gone also has a network of authorized installers who can install bird control products call 1-800-392-6915 or visit http://www.birdbgone.com

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New York Public Library installs bird netting to protect the building’s architectural features

Thursday, February 3rd, 2011

From WNYC.ORG:

New York Public Library Gets A Face-Lift

By Abbie Fentress Swanson: Interactive Content Producer

Wednesday, February 02, 2011

City officials joined New York Public Library President Paul LeClerc to celebrate the three-year, $50 million restoration of the Stephen A. Schwarzman building on 42nd Street on Tuesday.

The landmark Beaux-Arts building, known to some as the Great Library Building or the People’s Palace, was designed by the architects Carrère and Hastings before it opened on May 23, 1911. But a survey in 2006 revealed severe deterioration and soiling of the façade, especially in the Corinthian column capitals, lion head keystones and scroll modillions. The architecture and engineering firm that did the survey, Wiss, Janney, Elstner Associates, Inc., said that the deterioration was mostly sugaring due to acid raid, diesel exhaust and pigeon guano, among other things. There was also roof damage, oxidation of the building’s bronze doors and cracking on sculptures. Birds had made the façade their home. The library decided to try to restore it. “Our intention was to make the building look like it was when it was built,” said LeClerc.

After millions of dollars were raised, an architectural and conservation team set out to repair 7,000 instances of deterioration in 2008 on the 150,000 square-foot façade. Over three years, some 18,000 square feet of bird netting was installed. “Over 1,000 cracks were repaired. Over 2,000 hand-carved marble patches, or dutchmen, were installed and nearly 900 marble balusters were replaced,” said LeClerc.

Read the complete article here

_____________________________________________________________________________________________

From Bird-B-Gone, Inc.:

“New York Public Library installs bird netting to protect the building’s architectural features”

Many cities, municipalities and property owners install Bird Netting to protect historic buildings. Bird Netting is a humane way of blocking birds from getting to unwanted areas where droppings and nesting materials can ruin and stain facades and corrode building materials. Bird Netting is effective for all bird species and can be installed to keep birds off buildings, rooftops, eaves, warehouses, rafters and other areas.

Heavy Duty Bird Net from Bird-B-Gone carriers an industry leading 10 year guarantee and is available in stock sizes and custom cuts. We also offer a complete line of professional grade hardware to ensure your bird net installation lasts.Visit us online at http://www.birdbgone.com/products/bird-netting/ or call us at 1-800-392-6915 for additional details.

Don’t have the time, resources or staff to install bird netting? We have a network of trained authorized installers across the globe who can install bird netting and other bird exclusion products. Call us today at 1-800-392-6915 for an installer in your area.

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Pigeon Control Said Necissary in Recent Pompeii Collapses

Tuesday, December 14th, 2010

From News Daily:

A statue is seen in front of a long section of a rustic retaining wall in the garden of the House of the Moralist, which collapsed after heavy rains in Pompeii November 30, 2010. REUTERS/Ciro De Luca

“Pompeii collapses spark worry and outrage”


By Philip Pullella

Posted 2010/12/13 at 12:25 pm EST



POMPEII, Italy, Dec. 13, 2010 (Reuters) — Pompeii mayor Claudio D’Alessio does not want to go down in history linked with Pliny the Younger, the Roman who chronicled the destruction of the ancient city nearly 2,000 ago in an eruption of Mount Vesuvius.

The collapses sparked charges of official neglect by Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi’s center-right government and calls for the resignation of Culture Minister Sandro Bondi, who has imposed cuts to arts spending as part of austerity measures.

….

“We must invest in regular maintenance. This does not attract attention but is very necessary,” said Cevoli, adding that removing weeds from roofs and walls is not as enticing as light shows and holograms but it does stop water infiltration.

Cevoli says there have been seven collapses in a year but not all of them have received the publicity they deserved.

Judith Harris, author of the 2007 book “Pompeii Awakened,” said it would be important that sponsors let archaeologists do what they feel is necessary.

“There is no glamour in pigeon control and weed removal but they are necessary,” she said.

Read The Original Post Here

_________________________________________________________________________

From Bird-B-Gone:

Pigeon droppings have been the source of deterioration and defilement on historic sites across the world. Recent renovations on Italy’s famed Leaning Tower of Pisa included the removal of pigeon droppings which had soiled many of the towers stones.  Herculaneum, a lesser known city also buried in Mt. Vesuvius’s eruption in 79 AD was also recently having problems with pigeon droppings wearing away roofs and walls of the ruins. Damage done by bird droppings on a 14th century cathedral ending up costing the city of Milan and extra $7.9m or more in repairs.

Bird droppings are acidic and will eat through paint, and corrode building materials such as stone and metal. Left unattended, affected areas may need restoration or complete replacement. Whether it’s an irreplaceable historic monument, or a contemporary roof or building, it is important to address pigeons or bird problems when they are noticed. The sooner a bird problem is addressed, the easrier it will be to persuade the birds to move on.

Bird-B-Gone offers a complete line of effective and humane bird deterrents to help prevent birds from nesting or roosting on homes, buildings, warehouses, and other areas. Visit http://www.birdbgone.com to learn more about our extensive line of professional grade bird control products including bird netting, bird spikes, bird repellents, electric bird deterrents, bird slope, and more. If you want advice for your particular bird problem, please call us at 1-800-392-6915 or email nobirds@birdbgone.com

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Bird Proofing for Architects and Engineers

Monday, May 24th, 2010

Whether you’re planning a hospital or hotel, an office building or retail complex, clients are increasingly expressing concern over bird defacement and damage. While the building or structure may look magnificent when completed, without effective bird proofing measures, pest birds soon invade to poop all over signs, roofs and beautiful facades.

Pigeons are probably the worst offenders, with each bird averaging about 25 pounds of droppings annually. Multiply that times several hundred birds per location and you’ve got quite a mess on your hands. Hawks and swallows may occasionally cause unexpected and unusual pest bird problems. And blackbirds and crows have certainly done their share of damage. Even woodpeckers have been known to peck unsightly holes into wood facades while digging for insects or to simply communicate with other woodpeckers. Without bird proofing, your beautiful building can lose its luster fairly quickly.

As most people know, much of the damage done by birds is caused by bird droppings. The acidity in these droppings can severely degrade most stone and metal materials, eventually reaching substrate areas to cause irreparable damage. Birds are often drawn in large flocks to the nooks, crannies and porticos of structures. They like to build nests on roof ledges, windowsills, and building projections. And they enjoy perching and pooping all over signs, statues, trusses and beams. These areas not only offer high visibility from which to observe potential food sources, but they provide shelter and protection from ground-based predators.

(more…)

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Bird Control for Commercial Applications

Monday, September 21st, 2009

Building owners and businesses spend millions of dollars annually to deal with infestations and the problems associated with pest birds. The risks associated with these pests increase year after year as bird populations continue to grow in both inner city and urban environments. The fact is, these pests are out of their natural element and without proper bird control measures, they can wreak havoc on commercial buildings and the people around them.

Perhaps the most obvious of problems are the droppings pest birds leave, which are not only unsightly, but can cause accelerated deterioration of buildings, structures and statues. Limestone is particularly susceptible, not just to a bird’s droppings, but the acid secretion produced by the fungi that live in them. Cleaning and restoring buildings so damaged can be expensive. Nests and droppings can quickly clog gutters and down pipes. Left unchecked, these bird by-products can lead to timber and structural damage, unsightly decor, and huge repair costs. Pigeons nesting around commercial air conditioning units deposit fecal matter that can get sucked into ducts, grilles and vents, damaging these expensive systems. Bird droppings that accumulate on ledges, sills and signage are unsightly and ruin the image of a business, especially an eatery. Droppings deposited on pavements, entrances and fire escapes makes them hazardous as pedestrians may slip and fall on them, creating a huge legal liability to commercial property owners. One quickly can see why bird control has become so vital to commercial building owners.

But bird control solves other problems as well. There’s the incessant and irritating noise pest birds produce whey they gather in sizeable numbers. They not only annoy maintenance workers, but can be distracting to visitors in hotels, hospitals and office complexes. Another problem is the offensive odor many birds produce—both in droppings and nesting—a particular nuisance to restaurants with outdoor service. Droppings also spoil finished products in loading bays and storage areas. They can severely stain and damage goods, ruin expensive paintwork, and mar the appearance of costly finished goods, metal panels, and stonework. Droppings can also eat into and destroy wood, paper and cardboard packaging.

Pest birds can be a health hazard, carrying and transmitting any of 60 known diseases. Sparrows and Feral Pigeons can carry bacteria causing Salmonellosis. Feral Pigeons carry Ornithosis, which is similar to viral pneumonia. Birds, bird droppings and their nesting materials contain insects and mites. These insects can damage property, stored foods and fabrics.

As many building owners have learned, keeping pigeons and other pest birds away from commercial buildings is not an easy thing to do. These days, proper bird control takes more than a plastic owl or two to scare away pests. What to do?

Thankfully, there are a number of effective and humane bird control products to keep pest birds off your property. Most are maintenance free and easy to install. Bird spikes, for example, are ideal for pigeons and other large birds. Some have spikes made of strong, rigid unbreakable polycarbonate. Others have stainless steel spikes. Another useful bird control product is the bird spider. It’s ideal for awnings and patio covers. The spider arms move with the breeze, keeping pest birds from landing. Most of these deterrents are sturdy and stable, come in a variety of diameters, and install easily. They also won’t harm the birds.

Another effective bird control solution is bird netting. It’s ideal for a broad range of commercial uses, including signs, warehouses, courtyards, canopies, airplane hangars and rooftops. With its ability to control all species of birds, bird netting is often prescribed by architects. Some products in this category are U.V. stabilized, flame resistant and rot and waterproof. The webbing is usually available in a variety of mesh sizes to deter sparrow, starlings, pigeons, seagulls and larger birds.

A simple, easy-to-install bird control device that discourages bird pests from landing and nesting is the bird slope. These angled, slippery panels are ideal for eaves, ledges, beams and other 90-degree areas where pest birds tend to nest and roost. Also simple and easy to apply are bird gels. This bird control measure creates a sticky surface that birds hate.

Finally, there are the higher –tech bird control solutions, known as electric-track systems.  Ideal for deterring all types of pest birds, these are easily mounted on ledges, signs, rooftops, and flat or curved surfaces. They discourage birds from landing by conveying a mild electric shock that’s harmless to birds. They also alter a bird’s habits to nest or feed. These systems are low profile and almost invisible. Be sure to get a flow-through design to prevent water from damming up on rooftops and other surfaces. Look for corrosion-resistant products that can stand up to alkali and acidic environments.  The bottom line: bird control is good for your business.

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Excluding Pest Birds with Bird Netting

Tuesday, July 28th, 2009

By Fran Prisco

Bird NettingBirds can be considered a pest when they decide to roost or nest in areas where their feces and debris can be considered a hazard.  Each year building owners and homeowners spend countless hours and money cleaning up after and repairing the damage caused by pest birds. Not only are these problems unsightly; pest birds and their feces can spread 60 plus transmittable diseases. Safety, sanitation and health hazards caused by bird droppings can pose serious liability risks, and left untreated, can lead to accidents and lawsuits. Bird feces, bird nests and debris can also create a bad public image with tenants and patrons. Individuals, companies and government agencies are tired of cleaning up bird feces or repairing the damage that is caused by pest birds and their droppings. Instead they have decided to invest in a Bird Control Solution, which is often as simple as installing bird netting.

Bird netting is used to exclude pest birds from areas such as rooftops, warehouses, airline hangars, overhangs, eaves of homes and other enclosed areas that pest birds are to be kept out of.  Netting will provide 100% exclusion of pest birds and is a long-term bird control solution.  Bird netting comes in several different mesh sizes ranging from ¾” mesh for use with all types of birds, to 2” mesh to use when larger birds like pest pigeons and seagulls are a problem.  Netting comes in several colors as well; white, stone and black.  Black bird netting is usually preferred because of its natural U.V. protection and lack of discoloration due to dirt and dust.  When installed properly, the netting will be virtually invisible, not interfering with the architectural features of a building.

Choosing the right bird netting:

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