Archive for August, 2011

Funny: Alternative Bird Control Methods

Wednesday, August 31st, 2011

At Bird-B-Gone we have more than a few sayings… “It’s More Than Just Bird Control, It’s Faith, Family, Friends”, “Ladies and Gentleman, the Birds Have Left the Building” and on a lighter note to help us keep things in perspective, “It’s Only Bird Control”.

Here’s a look at some funny bird control methods we came across online this week:

New Product: SEAGULLAWAY

 

Dancing The Birds Away: From the Globe and Mail

(John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail)

Amy Mitchell busts a move atop the City of Vancouver’s landfill in Delta. Dancing is one of the many ways in which Amy Mitchell is able to stop the birds from landing at the dump site.

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These methods were pretty hilarious, and most likely effective, but pest birds can be no laughing matter if their droppings or nesting materials are staining or corroding surfaces, clogging drains, creating a health hazard or just a plain mess. If you have a problems with birds landing or nesting in unwanted areas, contact us at 1-800-392-6915 or email nobirds@birdbgone.com. Our Bird Control Engineers can help consult you on which products to use, how to install them, or get you in contact with an authorized installer in your area.

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Bird-B-Gone University – September 23rd

Tuesday, August 30th, 2011

Bird-B-Gone University is a FREE training course designed to teach the basics of bird control .

The Next class will be help Friday September 23rd at our warehouse in Santa Ana, CA

If you are looking to expand your business by increasing the services your company provides, or just looking to develop your bird control knowledge, this is an excellent opportunity for you!

Bird-B-Gone is the leading manufacturer of professional grade bird deterrents and provides superior customer service, training and support. Those who attend the class will receive a certificate of completion and are added to our list of authorized installers. Attendees who work in California will receive credits towards their branch II SPCB license.

The next class is Friday, September 23rd 2011

Classes are held at the Bird-B-Gone manufacturing facility in Santa Ana, California. The all-day course includes:

Bird Spikes Stainless Steel TileRoof Bird Netting

Learn from a company who supports you!

 

Bird-B-Gone actively promotes our line of products and puts a heavy emphasis on marketing. This marketing generates leads for residential, commercial and industrial “bird jobs”. We pass these leads on to our Authorized Installers! Class starts at 8 a.m. -  free lunch is served!

 

Classes fill up quickly, so contact Chris Fields today at 1-800-392-6915 or email chris@birdbgone.com

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Great Review of Bird-B-Gone Products in Yachtsman Magazine

Monday, August 22nd, 2011

Bird-B-Gone products were mentioned in the August “About the Bay” Section in Yachtsman Magazine. To learn more about keeping birds off boats, visit http://www.birdbgone.com

From Yachtsman Magazine:

About The Bay – August 2011

My friend Rich Evans, who keeps his Skookum 57, Sheba Star, over in Brisbane Marina, says he is having terrific luck with a product called Bird-B-Gone. Rich lives out of state and was having a terrible problem with pigeons perching in the rigging and pooping all over his decks until he found this great device. Rich claims that Bird-B-Gone has rendered the pigeon problem nil. He says that several of his marina neighbors have purchased the product and all are more than satisfied with the results. Rich is thinking of selling Sheba and purchasing a new Nordhavn 86. His slip in Brisbane is 88 feet long and he wants to get his money’s worth. For more information on the bird thing, visit www.birdbgone.com or call 800/392-6915.

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The Skinny on Bird Poop

Wednesday, August 17th, 2011

Written by resident Bird-B-Gone Ornithologist: Dr. Rob Fergus

About: Dr. Rob Fergus is an ornithologist who specializes in urban ecology and human/wildlife interactions. Dr. Fergus received his Ph.D. in urban bird conservation from the University of Texas at Austin.  After founding the Hornsby Bend Bird Observatory in Austin, Texas he created additional bird conservation programs in Austin as the first executive director of the  Travis Audubon Society.  From 2004 to 2009  he was the Senior Scientist for Urban Bird Conservation at the National Audubon Society. Dr. Rob has teamed up with Bird-B-Gone to help answer pest bird questions closing the gap between the science of nature, and the nature of bird control.


Lets face it, most of us like to have birds around, but we have a problem with their droppings.  The major complaint about bird droppings involve unsightly or smelly messes, concerns about property damage, as well as potential health risks.

Unsightly or Smelly Messes

Most of the time this is the real problem with bird droppings—we just don’t want to see them.  While that is certainly understandable, birds are part of our natural environment so we shouldn’t be too upset about the occasional bird dropping on our car, house, or patio furniture.  Bird droppings become more of a problem when we create structures like window sills, decks, or utility lines where birds come to sit frequently and do their duty.  If bird droppings are accumulating the first thing to look at is how to alter the landscape so that the birds can’t physically come and sit where they are making the mess.  This may be done with architectural or structural modifications to a building or other structure, or by installing bird spikes or some other physical deterrents to keep the birds from being able to land where they want to sit.

Property Damage

More rarely accumulations of bird droppings may cause actual structural damage to buildings, bridges, machinery, and automobiles.  Bird droppings are acidic, which may cause some damage, but for automobiles the greater damage is done when car finishes expand in the sun and then contract around the dried bird dropping.  When birds eat berries, their droppings may stain paint, wood, or stucco.  To avoid property damage, wash bird droppings from any surface you want to protect as soon as possible.  Use a hose with a spray nozzle or a wet rag.   If the dropping has hardened, soak it with a wet rag or paper towel for ten minutes to soften it before rinsing or wiping it off.  You may want to use a household cleaner or a detergent formulated specifically for killing disease organisms associated with bird mess cleanups such as the Microcide SQ Disinfectant.

Potential Health Risks

Bird droppings may carry dozens of disease organisms that can be transmitted to people.  Risk to most people is usually small, but may be greater for young people, old people, and those with compromised immune systems.  It is always better to avoid contact with bird droppings when possible, and to clean up thoroughly following the general cleanup procedures outlined by the Internet Center for Wildlife Damage Management.  The following are the two main diseases that people may get from contact with bird droppings, usually after close contact with large accumulations of droppings and mostly from breathing in fungus that grows on the droppings:

 

  • Histoplasmosis is a disease caused by a contact with or inhalation of a fungus (Histoplasma capsulatum) which grows on bird and bat droppings.  Many people are infected without developing symptoms, but the very young and old, and those with compromised immune systems are at increased risk of developing severe infections.  Avoid areas with accumulations of bird droppings and if you have to clean up such a site, follow the directions in Histoplasmosis-Protecting Workers at Risk.  For more information see the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website.
  • Cryptococcosis is another fungal disease contracted mostly by breathing in the fungal cells of Cryptococcus neoformans growing on bird droppings.  Sometimes the disease causes pneumonia-like symptoms, while other times it spreads to the nervous system causing cryptococcal meningitis.  For more information see the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website.
  • Other Diseases that may be transmitted from birds to humans through droppings include:

If you have concerns about possible exposure to these diseases, please contact your doctor or a health care professional.  For more specific information about bird control products to keep birds from landing and making a mess on your building or other structure, check out physical deterrents that might work in your situation, submit a specific question to  nobirds@birdbgone.com, or call a Bird-B-Gone bird control specialist toll free at 800-392-6915.

 

More Information

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Bird-B-Gone Launches Today’s Facility Manager Bird Control Channel

Tuesday, August 9th, 2011

From Today’s Facility Manager:

 

By Mary Ellen McCandless, on August 8, 2011, at 3:30 pm

Bird-B-Gone has unveiled its new Bird Control Channel on the Today’s Facility Manager website.


Founded in 1992, Bird-B-Gone’s products have helped solve pest bird problems in commercial, industrial and residential settings across the globe. Bird-B-Gone offers effective and humane solutions to prevent birds from landing and roosting in unwanted areas. Products include Bird Netting and Hardware, Bird Spikes, Electric Track Systems, Live Traps and more. Bird-B-Gone has a devoted team of bird control engineers with over 80 years of combined experience to help in all aspects of bird control including design and installation.

 

Visit Bird-B-Gone’s Bird Control Channel to learn more.

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How to Keep Pest Birds Out of Airplane Hangars

Thursday, August 4th, 2011

Written By: Fran Prisco

Airplane hangars have often become a natural habitat for birds.  They are wide open, offer shelter and ideal nesting areas. Clinton Air Force Base in Oklahoma had six hangars with 200-300 house sparrows in each hangar. Lockbourne Air Base in Ohio had 2,000 to 3,000 house sparrows between three hangars with an additional 2,000-3,000 starlings.  Along with these birds come the droppings and debris they leave behind.  Bird droppings, accumulating on the aluminum skin of airplanes, can corrode the metal and eventually weaken the structure itself. Another serious concern is that if droppings, feathers, and other matter get into the engines, critically important parts must be cleaned as they could stop an engine during flight. Cleaning an aircraft engine is very expensive and time consuming.

Pest bird droppings can also pose significant health risks, carrying and transmitting any of 60 known diseases. Sparrows and Feral Pigeons can carry bacteria causing Salmonellosis. Feral Pigeons carry Ornithosis, which is similar to viral pneumonia. Not only do the droppings and debris left behind by birds damage the airplanes kept in hangars, they are also dangerous to the personal working on the planes.

Problem: Pest birds are causing added maintenance to aircraft and endangering airline personal with their droppings and debris.  Thousands of dollars spent each year on cleaning aircraft skins, engines and airplane hangar infrastructures.

Solution: Install bird netting in the airplane hanger.  Bird netting is an exclusionary bird control system.  Once installed, pest birds are excluded from the area being protected by the bird net.  It is often necessary to install bird netting on the sides of the walls as well as under the roof.  The goal is to block off any areas that pest birds will find attractive to land, roost and nest.  Once installed, the bird netting is virtually invisible and will need very little maintenance.  In fact there are bird net installations inside airplane hangars that have gone untouched for well over 10 years and are still as effective as the day that they where installed.

When choosing bird netting to install in an airplane hangar or any area, be sure to get heavy-duty bird netting that has a break strength of at least 45 pounds.  This ensures that the netting will be strong enough to keep birds from defeating it.  Bird netting comes in various mesh sizes.  The ¾ inch mesh bird netting is ideal for all types of birds, the mesh is small enough so that even small birds like sparrows cannot get through.  If large birds like pigeons and gulls are the issue, choose a bird netting with a 2-inch mesh size, this can save a lot of money for large bird netting jobs.

If the bird netting installation looks to be too complicated, look for a professional bird control installer in your area that can help.   Manufacturers of bird control products can usually suggest the right person or company for the job.

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If you would like to learn more about Bird Netting including Bird Net installation advice and more, visit Bird-B-Gone, Inc. Bird-B-Gone sells a heavy duty professional grade bird netting meant for permanent use along with a complete line of installation hardware. Need advice on a bird net job? The experienced Bird Control Engineers at Bird-B-Gone can help! Call 1-800-392-6915 email nobirds@birdbgone.com or visit http://www.birdbgone.com

 

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